painting unfinished table white


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Old 07-05-01, 09:59 PM
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I recently purchased an unfinished pine table that I want to paint white. The owner of the furniture store said to wipe tung oil over any knot holes, let dry for 6-8 hours, then prime the table, sand and finally paint using enamel paint. However, the paint expert at LOWES told me to prime the table with 2 coats of latex primer, one coat of oil primer, then paint. I'm confused - which method is correct? (my main concern is to keep the knot holes from showing through)
Thanks,
Linda
 
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Old 07-06-01, 04:51 PM
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Linda:

And I'm going to tell you something different - but I know it works because it's the way I've been doing it for (well, we won't say just how MANY years...).

We're assuming first of all that the knots are tight, no cracks or anything that needs filling. If that's the case, get yourself the smallest can of shellac you can find. Remember, shellac has a definite shelf life and each can is dated. If it's been on the shelf more than 3 months, don't buy it.

"Paint" the knots with shellac and allow it to dry. Sand lightly. Prime with a primer compatible with whatever paint you're going to use, sand that lightly to remove any irregularities, then paint.

Shellac is the original 'knot sealer' and is the basis for many stain blocking primers made today.
 
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Old 07-07-01, 12:44 AM
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Thanks for the advice. I plan on painting a few more pieces of furniture in the future, so I am wondering what kind of filler would I use if I were to find a knothole with a crack?
-Also, I've scanned through the previous questions & responses regarding cat scratches on furniture and have seen you mention using a Minwax crayon to fill the scratches. Do you recommend that versus sanding the entire table? (The table has MANY scratches)
Thanks again for your expert advice,
Linda
 
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Old 07-07-01, 05:07 PM
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Linda:

If the crack is on the top of a piece, I'd use a paste wood filler such as Famowood. Elsewhere I's probably use a vinyl spackling compound. The reason for the differentiation is this:

1- Famowood (or a similar product) dries harder, although it's a little messier to use.

2- Spackle is easier to use and sand, but it's softer - hence the reason NOT to use it on a 'wearing' surface.

The 'Blendfil' crayons by Minwax are handy for filling a scratch AND restoring color in one operation. I don't suggest them for a top for the same reason I don't use spackle on painted tops. They're too soft.

If the scratch color returns when you wipe the area down with paint thinner, you don't need a pencil - just another layer or two of finish will resolve the problem. It's not necessary to strip.

 
 

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