Cabinet hinge issue/solution


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Old 03-22-23, 12:26 PM
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Cabinet hinge issue/solution

Hi guys, I have a large built in cabinet in my dining room. There are 8 cabinet doors that span across on the bottom of the built in. You can see two of the cabinet doors in the picture below. These cabinet doors are heavy and each door has two hinges. The screws that go into the hinges are short. The problem that keeps persisting is that after a period of use, the wood that holds the screw loosens, so the cabinet door "slides." This means in order to close the cabinet door, I have to "lift" and then close the door. My theory is that the hinges are not the right ones to support the door. I do not want to replace the hinges because every cabinet in the built in has these hinges, which are also a design element that you can see when closed.

In the past, I have already repaired several hinges by filling the hole with toothpicks/glue, sawing off the protruding part of the toothpick, sanding it down, painting over it, and then drilling the screw back in. But this has become a problem across all the cabinets and I am looking for a permanent solution so I don't have to keep making repairs.

The way I look at it, I thought of two possible solutions. The first solution is to add a third hinge in the middle of the two existing hinges for more support. While it seems two hinges should be enough for a cabinet door of that size, I have to remind you guys again that the doors are heavy.

The other solution is to remove the screws from the hinge that goes into the cabinet wall and replace it with a longer screw so that maybe it will hold on better and with stand the weight of the door when it opens and closes.

For you experienced woodworkers, what do you suggest? Thank you for all feedback.




 
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Old 03-22-23, 01:21 PM
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Those are lighter duty hinges. A third hinge will help, but part of your problem is that the hinges have slotted holes to allow for adjustment and that allows the doors to slide against the hinges. After a few cycles, that motion levers the screws so the holes in the wood enlarge and the problem gets worse. So, after adding a third hinge, and after getting the door adjusted right where you want it, I'd drill four more holes through each hinge, two in each "leaf" and then add 4 more screws. They won't be in slots, so they should prevent the doors from moving against the hinges. If there is clearance, use pan head screws instead of flat head as they have more resistance against sliding.

On second thought, I'd remove the hinges and drill the holes through the hinges first, and then drill small pilot holes in the wood for the new screws when you remount everything and have it lined up.

Definitely use longer screws on the cabinet side of the hinges.

One final tip, you can squirt a little CA glue (superglue) in the holes in the wood to strengthen it so the screws are less likely to loosen up. Use the thin type glue and let it dry before you drive the screws in. You are not trying to glue the screws in place, just reinforce the wood where the screws go.
 
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Old 03-23-23, 05:21 AM
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Thank you. How would I drill through the hinge? I do have a drill, but does that have enough power to break through the steel of the hinge? Besides, won't drilling so many holes through it impact the integrity and strength of the hinge?

Would it make more sense to get different hinges where maybe there's 3 screws on each side of the hinge and the hole is not slotted? It's just a singular hole that allows no movement for the screw?

The only thing is, the hinge is obviously a design element. We want to keep some sort of design element with the hinge there.
 
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Old 03-23-23, 05:33 AM
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Get the doors adjusted the way you want them, then drill a single hole in the middle of each of your existing hinges and put a screw in. Problem solved.
 
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Old 03-23-23, 05:37 AM
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Looks like only the top hinge is moving.
So I would figure out how much it is moving
Then cut a small piece of metal plate to fit under the screw in the hinge slot to stop the hinge plate from moving on the door.
The screw should hold it in place.
 
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Old 03-23-23, 12:27 PM
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Manden, the thing is, on some of the other cabinets, the hinge that's moving is the hinge attached to the cabinet side, not the door. I think a complete redo of some sort is needed on all the hinges to ensure it's tight and not moving.
 
 

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