epoxy garage floor sealant

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  #1  
Old 12-08-03, 01:57 PM
travinta
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Question epoxy garage floor sealant

Anyone know anything about the epoxy garage floor sealants being advertised? Looks like a nice finish, easier to sweep up, no oil stains, etc. I know Lowe's & Home Depot sell some kits, but is this a case of "you get what you pay for?"

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 12-08-03, 10:59 PM
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  #3  
Old 12-09-03, 08:42 AM
Stacy
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epoxy sealants

Yes, it is, you get what you pay for. Epoxies will crack once they dry, or cure. Then you'll be left with a floor that seaps water in. What you need to do is seal it with a flexible coating, so as to not get that cracking once you seal the floor. If you use an epoxy, you'll get a spiderweb reaction on the floor, in most cases. I have had 100% success in my applications of this type by using a flexible coating verses epoxy. http://www.sanitred.com/ConcreteRepair.htm

Hope this helps,

Stacy
 

Last edited by Stacy; 12-09-03 at 11:13 AM.
  #4  
Old 12-09-03, 06:40 PM
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Forget the epoxy. Stacy is correct. Bad stuff. It must be a fad going around. Many have asked about this stuff in the past few months. What is even more amazing is that there are some who recommend it. Concrete is like a living enity. It never really hardens completely. It is always hardening, expanding and contracting. When dealing with concrete, there is no cure all. All is different because no two loads of concrete are mixed exactly the same. Pay the price and use a concrete sealer. Not epoxy, not paint, but a sealer. Good Luck
 
  #5  
Old 12-11-03, 03:12 PM
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Oooops. Now is not a good time to be reading this. I just used an Epoxy paint for my garage/workshop, and was very impressed with how it turned out. I did it about a month ago. But I didnít count on what you guys are describing. AND, it wasnít cheap. $79 for (2) x one gallon cans. The slab is 53 years old, do you still envision spider web type cracking on a slab that old?
 
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Old 12-11-03, 05:48 PM
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Wlightfoot:
In your case you may be lucky. You stated your concrete is 53 years old, which may end up being the saving factor. Concrete was made differently in those days. Not as many chemicals, hardeners etc. I would just keep your fingers crossed and wait. Good Luck
 
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Old 12-12-03, 08:00 AM
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That is what I'll do! Thanks!
 
  #8  
Old 12-14-03, 11:39 PM
travinta
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I talked with a guy at Sherwin-Williams today re: their concrete stain. He claimed it would also seal it & make it easier on sweeping up. Wondering if anyone's heard of its use, or knows of any pros/cons.

I'd agree with the above -- none of this stuff is cheap. The stain alone is $25/gallon (half the price of the Rust-Oleum at Home Depot) but you still have to get the degreaser, the etcher, the anti-slip coating ... (sigh)
 
  #9  
Old 12-15-03, 07:40 AM
Stacy
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A stain is pretty much what they call it- a stain- if it were a sealer, it would be called just that. Just keep in mind, that if you apply this stain, you'll know immediately that it's not a sealer. Then you'll have to remove the stain, acid etch and then neutralize just to prepare your surface again, to try something else. The link that I gave you in a previous post to this subject is quite helpful. Granted, it will cost more than $25.00 a gallon--but it'll work. In the long run, you need to consider the time and effort you're going to put into this floor, and how many times you're going to be willing to attempt to seal it. Not to mention all of the work involved in prepping your floor surface...

Stacy
 
  #10  
Old 12-17-03, 11:44 AM
capricorn
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Lightbulb

I have to believe that it is a "get what you pay for" type of product. I have known people that have used the cheaper products from home depot and were dissappointed by the results. After their failures and my research, I used the U Coat It brand of products and am satisfied with the results. Applied a three coat system to the garage floor, and got a high gloss with a decorative "terazzo" finish. The first two coats were a water based epoxy, and the third coat was a urethane clear coat. The finish is incredible looking! I have had nothing but "shock and awe" over how good the floor looks. My friends and neighbors have even installed U Coat on their floors now(trying to keep up with Jones I guess), and it seem like the real deal. Ordered over the net and it showed up on my front porch. Prep work was detailed as I had many soils in my concrete, but it was woth it! Check out their website at www.ucoatit.com Hope this helps helps you or at least gives you another option.
 
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Old 12-17-03, 05:19 PM
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Triventa:
What the man at Sherman & Williams showed you, is exactly what you want to use. It is a colored sealer. It is not cheap but it works great. Good Luck
 
  #12  
Old 12-22-03, 07:01 PM
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I have the sherwin william epoxy on my concrete floor. It was $70 a gallon. Hard as nails. But if it get wet, slippery as ball bearing. I would do it again in a heartbeat. Very happy.
 
  #13  
Old 12-24-03, 09:10 PM
demoman
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We use the epoxy coatings in the factory all the time. Just used a new one at the receiveing dock that included a very heavy sand load (anti slip). Looks great! And not at all slippery when wet. None of the epoxy coatings throughout the factory are cracked, redone every five-six years. We build medical equipment which is the reason for the coating. If you'd like more info on the product the contractor used, let me know, I'm sure I could find out the details.
 
  #14  
Old 01-05-04, 07:43 AM
Chucker
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Question

I just laid an Armstrong VCT in my garage in a checkerboard pattern. The floor is concrete with Wirsbo tubing that maintains the floor at 70 deg f.

I want to seal the floor so that I can wash my car in there. There is a floor drain and it is sloped to the sewer.

I am looking for a clear sealer that will offer years of durability and high gloss appearance.

I know that I will sacrifice traction (it will be slippery when wet) but after washes, it will be squeegee'd off and the warmth of the floor will allow it to dry quickly.

I know nothing last for ever, so something that will offer a CLEAR high gloss with minimal re-application would be awesome.

Thanks,

Chucker the Fireman
 
  #15  
Old 01-16-04, 01:58 PM
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So which to use

Okay, I understand not to use the garage floor products being offered at Home Depot and Loews, but which of the others mentioned in this thread are good to use? The UCoat product and Flektek products look most like what I'm searching for. An aesthetically pleasing, high quality floor surface. The stuff that Stacy mentioned may be great, but from the website offered, I can't seem to find garage floor applications, or any color or finish options. If I'm going to drop 500 dollars, I want to be satisfied and comfortable that it will be long lasting.
 
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Old 01-16-04, 02:07 PM
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So which to use

Okay, I understand not to use the garage floor products being offered at Home Depot and Loews, but which of the others mentioned in this thread are good to use? The UCoat product and Flektek products look most like what I'm searching for. An aesthetically pleasing, high quality floor surface. The stuff that Stacy mentioned may be great, but from the website offered, I can't seem to find garage floor applications, or any color or finish options. If I'm going to drop 500 dollars, I want to be satisfied and comfortable that it will be long lasting.
 
  #17  
Old 01-22-04, 10:20 AM
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anyone?
 
  #18  
Old 02-03-04, 11:27 AM
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Any reason this thread seems to have died? Moderators, if you could answer the question I had originally posted above this reply, I would appreciate it. Still seems to be some confusion on which product is best for the homeowner.
 
  #19  
Old 02-03-04, 04:00 PM
capricorn
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I think this thread has died because all those able to offer advice have done so and it's up to you th choose which product you are purchasing. It sounds like you have it narrowed down, now I would call each company and talk to someone about the specifics of their product and decide which one to use. Spring is right around the corner and apllication season for these type of products are gearing up, so go for it! Your garage floor will look and perform great!
 
  #20  
Old 02-28-04, 07:34 PM
SometimesFixIt
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Does the cement need to cure for a certain amount of time before attempting anything like this? I'm moving into a new townhouse in the spring. Should I wait until summer 2005 before sealing/painting/covering the new floor? I live in Chicago and there is a big spread between summer and winter temps!
 
  #21  
Old 03-02-04, 02:59 PM
capricorn
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it depends on which type of epoxy you use. Some systems the concrete only has to cure 30 days, on some it is much longer. Call the specific company whos' product you are considering using, and they will give you the details
 
  #22  
Old 03-04-04, 10:58 AM
dzaborow
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garage floor paint/coatings

If any one is interested in painting there garage floor.
I would recommend a product called original color chips. It is a high quality floor coating system. And they have many options to create your own custom floor. There web-site address is http://www.originalcolorchips.com
If you contact them they will answer any questions that you might have.
 
  #23  
Old 01-10-05, 10:41 AM
ezproject
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Thumbs up Go to Floorchips

I suggest that you do not buy the kits. Buy a quality epoxy paint and sealer.
Then buy the epoxy paint chips, the COLORS YOU WANT!!

My floor turned out awesome with floorchips
 
  #24  
Old 12-29-05, 12:23 PM
surge
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i realize this thread is old, but I am looking to do the epoxy as well. For those that have done it, how is the durability with respect to heavy items moving across it? I have a table saw that can be propped up on castors and rolled around. I am worried that it might leave roll marks in the epoxy or even possibly black marks from the wheels rolling around. Since it has been a few years now since the thread started I figured it would be a good time to ask.
 
  #25  
Old 12-29-05, 02:32 PM
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As you stated, I painted my floor quite a while ago, maybe coming up on two years, and have been extremely happy with it. I have experienced no spider web cracks as was suggested might happen. I too have a table saw mounted on wheels that I move about, and there has been no peeling, streaking, etc. Unfortunately, itís been so long, I canít remember the manufacture of the mix, but it was the high dollar stuff at Home Depot. I was so happy with it, I painted the Furnace room and Laundry room with it as well, just to make sweeping/cleaning easier.

One happy Epoxy Paint customer.
 
  #26  
Old 01-03-06, 09:56 PM
kirk28
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epoxy paint

Epoxy paints can provide a longlasting durable finish. The key is surface preparation. Any foreign substances such as dirt, oil, sealers must be removed and the surface pores must be opened up mechanically by grinding or chemically by acid etching. Most pros use shotblast machines to strip floors but my garage was scrubbed cleaned with concrete cleaner and acid etched. So far after three years it's still looks great. I bought the epoxy at a concrete/masonry contractor supply store. It's a water based epoxy so it was very user friendly. I also put a coat of clear concrete sealer on top with texture beads broadcasted over the wet sealer to create a non-slip surface. If you need more info check out http://www.all-things-concrete.com/c...oor-paint.html
 
 

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