Excessive Water in Garage (from snow on car)


  #1  
Old 12-10-03, 02:01 PM
IainL
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Unhappy Excessive Water in Garage (from snow on car)

Hello,

My garage floor does not have a drain in it. When I return from driving my car in the rain or snow, I have a problem with excessive amounts of water collecting on the garage floor. I am worried that this water could cause damage to my walls.

I am looking for a solution that doesn't involve chopping a drain hole in the floor. Does anyone have a suggestion?
 
  #2  
Old 12-11-03, 11:38 AM
Stacy
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I think that a drain hole might be the only answer. Unless you want to create a "trench" as a diversion--but I believe this will be less effective.

Stacy
 
  #3  
Old 12-12-03, 05:11 AM
B
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Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
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I sure wish there was a good answer to that problem; or even a so-so answer.

I thought I would solve this several years ago when I poured a new floor by sloping the floor toward the door. Worked great until the runoff stopped against the door and froze the door down to the floor! That was a bigger problem than the standing water. What I do now is just shovel out the ice chunks and keep after the water with a sqeegee.

Be aware that if you ever consider adding a drain to your garage, you need to contact the local building inspector. There are a lot of codes and requirements for this.

Bruce
 
  #4  
Old 12-12-03, 07:51 AM
IainL
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Possible Solution?

What do you all think about calking/attaching some rubber strips to the garage floor around the parameter of the car (leaving the garage door side open of course).

My thought is that this would at least contain the water and keep it from pooling against the walls or other items on the floor.


See item number cacd800
http://www.acmerubber.com/dbumpers.htm

Or
http://cableorganizer.com/surface-ra...ire-guards.htm



Any thoughts or comments?
 
  #5  
Old 12-12-03, 11:16 AM
B
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Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
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Received 8 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Something like that could work. My only comment is that it looks like a "tripper". I can just see myself walking thru the garage with an armload of groceries when one of the cars are gone and tripping over it. Then I'd be forced to say a lot of bad words!

I have to replace the floor slab in my garage one of these days and I am trying to decide what to do. I've thought about sloping down a couple inches from all four walls to the center, but am still not sure this is a good idea. I guess I just don't have a real good idea for either of us.

Bruce
 
  #6  
Old 12-12-03, 01:18 PM
B
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Location: USA
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Just an F.Y.I. for others following this thread:

I just got back from a meeting on one of my projects with a mechanical engineer. He told me that code in this area allows, WITH APPROVAL OF THE LOCAL INSPECTOR, a floor drain in a single family residential garage if there is no trap and it "daylights" on grade (no connection to any storm or sanitary sewer). This actually makes a floor drain in my garage feasible; I always thought I would have to put in a flammable waste trap like we do in commercial work.

Looks like I'm off to see the City inspector when I get closer to doing this.

Bruce
 
 

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