Rustoleum Garage Floor Epoxy

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  #1  
Old 04-08-04, 07:07 PM
Trbr81
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Rustoleum Garage Floor Epoxy

Has anyone applied this stuff on your garage floor? How has it held up?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-13-04, 02:20 AM
andrewkuehne
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I recently bought some from Lowes...still waiting for the weather t warm up to apply it...
 
  #3  
Old 05-02-04, 10:49 AM
firedads
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A good friend of mine used the rustoleum product on his floor and he loves it. I am going to HD today to pick up their kit for 500 sq ft of coverage. One important factor he mentioned was to make sure your floor is clean. I believe the kit contains everything you need.
 
  #4  
Old 05-05-04, 12:52 PM
KSU4TC
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Red face Garage Floor Painting

I just got done painting the walls of my garage and am about to go buy some floor paint.

Hopefully the people @ Lowe's or HD can recommend everything I will need for this project.

I have also heard that you need to get the floor VERY clean.

After I am finished (hopefully this weekend) I'll let everyone know how it turned out.

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Last edited by Sharp Advice; 10-21-04 at 09:15 AM.
  #5  
Old 05-25-04, 08:23 PM
badgermarc
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Unhappy It works, but be careful

I put grey expoxy shield on last summer. It was a pain as far as prep work but it work and has held up. No cracks or missing pieces from tires. Looks very nice.

However, there is one big drawback. It is very, very slippery when wet. Both my 4 year old son and wife slipped multiple times on small amounts of slush this past winter. I went back to the instructions to see if it ever mentioned anything about adding some non-slip / skid additive. It did not mention anything. I had not used the "decorative chips" that come with the kit.

I e-mailed R-O tech support. I complained that nowhere in the instructions does it warn you. The person from R-O told me to reapply a second coat but to use a non-skid additive this time. They were nice in sending me a check for the cost of the second coat and the additive. However, I still have my work cut out for me as they want me to sand the 1st coat using 60 grit. He confirmed that the chips in the kit are decreative only and will not make it less slippery. (which is interesting as they now say on their website to add those chips to make a non-slip surface)

So, is it a good product? Yes, if you add the additive. It has finally gotten warm enough here in Wisconsin to use the prduct. This weekend I intend to do the sanding and the 2nd coat.

The question I have for anyone reading this is if they have a recommendation for non-skid additives. I bought a package of Behr non-skid additive and a package of TreadTex made by Homax. When I squueze the bag of Behr, it feels like very small grains. Almost like a bag of flour. When I squees the bag of TreadTex, it feels like much bigger granulas (like a bag of raw sugar). I'm afraid the Behr will not make enough of a difference.
 
  #6  
Old 05-31-04, 02:30 PM
Slippery Wing
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Good post badger,

I was wondering if the slipperyness would be an issue.

Has anyone looked at any similar products from other manufacturers? Rustoleum seems to be the favorite, but it is also expensive. I will probably need three gallons or so to do my garage.

The next question: Is it worth it, and would you recommend it?
 
  #7  
Old 06-08-04, 11:37 AM
errolholt
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Exclamation

Did Rustoleum technical support recommend a specific manufacturer for a non-skid additive?
 
  #8  
Old 06-09-04, 08:53 PM
errolholt
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I called Rustoleum technical support to solicit their recommendation of a specific non-skid additive. The representative could not offer a specific recommendation. When pressed, he mentioned VALSPAR as the one brand he could remember. I did not press my luck by asking him such impertinent questions such as:

[1] How much non-skid additive must I add to make it a safe surface?

[2] Should I add the non-skid additive BEFORE (or AFTER) waiting for the mixed epoxy to become ready to apply?

[3] Will the introduction of a non-skid additive reduce the product's stated areal coverage?

[4] If so, how might I estimate my actual requirements?

Does anyone here have any suggestions on how I should proceed?

Do you know of any sources (possibly a Rustoleum competitor) that might have this type of information?
 

Last edited by errolholt; 06-10-04 at 12:05 AM.
  #9  
Old 06-13-04, 12:37 PM
wm loughead
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doing it all the time

to answer as many questions as i can about all your garage flooring needs

I used this on my garage about two months ago i live in canada have four young kids and this stuff stands up to it

To clean my floor i had to power wash it and scrub it with a scrubber as i had grease oil and rust plus some fire extingher spray all over

I liked it and saw that their was no one out their doing it for people and found out that it can be quite lucritive their our other products out their all over they all need the same prep work but not all can be applied in one coat.

have fun
 
  #10  
Old 06-13-04, 07:42 PM
CuriousGeorge
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Alternative Product

I have been thinking about doing this for a few years and I am actually planning on doing it this year.

I have been planning on using a product called U Coat-it. THey have a really nice demo on thier website. www.ucoatit.com

It is a complete kit that comes with everyhting you need, even non-skid additive. It does seem to be on the high end in terms of cost. I have not priced the solutions at Home Depot yet.

I am really looking for a durable finish as I do not want to do the floor more than once.

I hope this was helpful.
 
  #11  
Old 06-15-04, 11:54 AM
simple_john
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rustoleum 2 part epoxy

i just applied the rustoleum 2 part epoxy - well so far only to 1/2 of the garage...

it went on well and as mentioned was a bit of a pain to prep for it.. but the other paints all required a primer coat so this was the lesser of 2 evils.. so far it looks great...


that ucoat it looks great but is about 2 times as expensive as the rustoleum.. the rustoleum cost me about 200$ for 1000 sq ft.

the ucoatit cost 245 for 550 sq ft. a bit too pricey for me.
 
  #12  
Old 06-30-04, 05:29 PM
wrkissel
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Rust-Oleum Epoxy Shield

Originally Posted by Trbr81
Has anyone applied this stuff on your garage floor? How has it held up?
I used Epoxy Shield in two garages last fall.

In the garage that is heated, Epoxy Shield has held up well. I cleans easily and hasn't chipped when tools have dropped on it. One minor problem--it has flaked off the sill where it is exposed to the weather. Even with this problem, I love it.

In the unheated garage, it was a disaster. Wherever salt water pooled from cars during the winter, the coating blistered and came off. Rust-Oleum refunded the cost of the material, but I have some work to do.

(I intend to try multiple-cleaning, etching, using a binding primer, then Epoxy Shield on the bare areas, folowed by a second coat of Epoxy Shield on the entire floor.)

By the way, I did a very thorough prep job in both garages. Other people have had much better results with less. My problems may have been due to the particular cement in the unheated garage.
 
  #13  
Old 08-01-04, 12:16 PM
joeox
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After 3 months

Hi all,

It's been about 3 months now since I applied the epoxy kit from HD. I think it was well worth the work since my house was brand new and didn't have any previous oil stains. I guess that hardest part of the job was waiting for 7 days for the paint to cure. I do see some chip paint marks in the floor from moving large heavy items. But, I guess I'll have to add another coat of paint in a couple of years. The floor is VERY VERY slippery, so I wished I added the non-slip additive.

Hope this helps.

I totally recommend the kit.
 
  #14  
Old 08-04-04, 03:18 PM
bmunger
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Question Moisture in the Floor

I have some moisture in the concrete of my garage floor. I wondered if anybody out there knows of a solution that would allow me to still use the Rustoleum Epoxy paint or a different type of garage floor paint. It's not really bad, but I don't want to apply any product if it's just going to peel away.
Thanks
 
  #15  
Old 08-05-04, 07:15 PM
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Last year my son and my wife used a 2 part epoxy on the floor of a new garage. It was rolled on with a roller and I made a mistake there. I did not use the right kind of roller and it turned out to be a bad job. It has nap all through the epoxy. It really looks bad. You only have about 30 minutes to work with it till it starts to set up.

Have plenty of help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As an example, It took 3 of us to do a 24'x24' garage and did not have any time for playing around.

Havent found out how to remedy our situation yet.

Good Luck!
 
  #16  
Old 08-05-04, 07:21 PM
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How did you test for moisture?

A simple way is take a 1' square piece of plastic and tape it on the concrete floor around all 4 edges so outside air does not enter the plastic. Leave overnite and check for moisture drops on the plastic in the morning.

Very Simple!
 
  #17  
Old 08-08-04, 07:46 PM
SSR
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I just applied the rustoleum epoxy on my garage floor. I used it in 85 degree temp and this made the epoxy very THIN, thinner than regular wall paint. Because of this it didn't seem to go on as thick and I ended up with a lot of extra. It seems to have turned out ok for the most part, except for the minor imperfections where the gloss levels don't match. I'm guessing this is because I used 3 seperate 250 sq. ft. kits and waited to mix them as I needed them just as the instructions say. I wish I woudl have mixxed them all at one time because I had a lot longer than the 1 hour working time the instructions specified.

Reffering to the anti-slip additive....the instructions with mine clearly says that the floor will be slippery when wet, and that the chips don't necessarily make it any better. It also goes on to say that you can add the anti-slip additive after mixing the 2 parts together. It does not mention any difference in the coverage when using an additive. I'm not really concerned about this because this garage is primarily a workshop and I won't really be driving in and out in the winter. I did choose to use the paint chips, it seems that the chips would make the floor at least a little less slippery when wet, but I'm not sure.
 
  #18  
Old 08-22-04, 08:33 PM
Jimmac
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Thumbs up

I just used the product today on my 1 car garage (approx 240 sq ft). It covered the entire area with a little epoxy left over. I did take the advice of several folks on the forum and opted for the non-slip additive. I bought it at Lowe's. It comes in a pint can and is produced by Valspar. It really seems to have made the floor very skid resistant. The floor looks great. Now we'll see how well it holds up.
 
  #19  
Old 08-25-04, 06:35 PM
anth_c
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Jimmac,

Can you describe the how the anti-slip additive affects the surface?

Does surface seem very coarse?

Are you able to kneel on the floor with-out the surface 'biting' into your skin?

Thanks,
Anthony

Note:
I helped instal the Rustolem paint in a friends garage about a year ago (we only used the decorative flakes, no anti-slip material). This was in Houston, in hot and humid weather. The results were great: the finish has held up well to lots of traffic, it also did a good job covering some minor cracks in the floor.
 
  #20  
Old 09-12-04, 06:58 PM
analogmusicman
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was in the "sandblasting" thread...rust-o-leum product

OK, scratch the "sandblasting", my compressor wouldn't keep up anyway! What I'm doing right now to get the old paint off the floor is putting on some "paint stripper", waiting about 1/2 hour, and then "power washing". (I'm using a 2400 psi washer) Slow work but it's getting done.
My question is this: Do you have to get EVERY little bit of paint off that floor or can little bits remain, like in the parts of the concrete that are sort of crumbling? Also, should the concrete be "etched" with muriatic acid? Any recommendations on "primer"? Should the concrete be "leveled" with some sort of filler after cleaning? How many coats of final epoxy? (I've been told two) Finally, are tire studs going to destroy the finish? (absolutely have to hhave studs on my car) Enough questions?

thanks
 
  #21  
Old 09-14-04, 06:32 PM
divinguy7
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Exclamation Applying Rustoleum Epoxy to a Sealed Garage Floor

Has anyone tried to apply this to a previously sealed garage floor? In tips area of the rustoleum website it says that it MIGHT NOT adhere properly to a sealed garage floor. I recently purchased the kit from HD, and i do not want to apply it to the floor if it wont stick right. Thanks in advance for your replies.
 
  #22  
Old 09-16-04, 11:40 PM
Towbot
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Question Floor Cleaning

I am new to this so bear with me,
I am thinking about using the Rustoleum Epoxy to coat my floor in my wood working shop in the basement. Probably will. The only refernces I have seen to Rustoleum Epoxy is in the Garage forum.
My question is has anyone tried using muriatic acid to clean the concrete? I have used this for cleaning concrete for other purposes and it has worked well. Everything that I have read here stresses getting the floor very clean. Just a thought.

Towbot
 
  #23  
Old 09-19-04, 06:34 PM
analogmusicman
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Don't know if muriatic acid will actually CLEAN concrete, I know it's used for ETCHING the concrete. (so the paint will stick, I guess)

thanks,
 
  #24  
Old 09-20-04, 11:39 AM
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Innerseal

Originally Posted by bmunger
I have some moisture in the concrete of my garage floor. I wondered if anybody out there knows of a solution that would allow me to still use the Rustoleum Epoxy paint or a different type of garage floor paint. It's not really bad, but I don't want to apply any product if it's just going to peel away.
Thanks
As in any application the rule of thumb is to ensure the substrate is clean, sound and dry. Probably 90% of coating failures are due to poor preparation.

There is a product called INNERSEAL made by Superior Products Int. II that works extemely well however it is an industrial product which would require ordering from an area distributor. It does exactly what the name says. It seals from the inside out. It also purges contaminents such as oils to the surface where it can then be simply washed away. This product will also restore old concrete that is badly deteriorated. We were able to solve a wet crawl space problem with this product. It was later discovered that there was an underground aquifier underneath the slab.
 
  #25  
Old 09-20-04, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by analogmusicman
OK, scratch the "sandblasting", my compressor wouldn't keep up anyway! What I'm doing right now to get the old paint off the floor is putting on some "paint stripper", waiting about 1/2 hour, and then "power washing". (I'm using a 2400 psi washer) Slow work but it's getting done.
My question is this: Do you have to get EVERY little bit of paint off that floor or can little bits remain, like in the parts of the concrete that are sort of crumbling? Also, should the concrete be "etched" with muriatic acid? Any recommendations on "primer"? Should the concrete be "leveled" with some sort of filler after cleaning? How many coats of final epoxy? (I've been told two) Finally, are tire studs going to destroy the finish? (absolutely have to hhave studs on my car) Enough questions?

thanks
As in any application the rule of thumb is to ensure the substrate is clean, sound and dry. Probably 90% of coating failures are due to poor preparation.

Another rule of thumb is, "If it's shiny then you need to rough it up"

Remember this type of product is far from bullet proof. It is going to wear over time depending on use and abuse. Unless you go to an industrial grade coating expect this to happen sooner than later. I personally prefer to use a coating that will last longer and will withstand abuse. I expect to pay more because I expect much more. Like anything else, you get what you pay for. "Nothing cheap is good, nothing good is cheap"
 
  #26  
Old 09-20-04, 11:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Towbot
I am new to this so bear with me,
I am thinking about using the Rustoleum Epoxy to coat my floor in my wood working shop in the basement. Probably will. The only refernces I have seen to Rustoleum Epoxy is in the Garage forum.
My question is has anyone tried using muriatic acid to clean the concrete? I have used this for cleaning concrete for other purposes and it has worked well. Everything that I have read here stresses getting the floor very clean. Just a thought.

Towbot
There are different types of concrete surfaces which require different types of preparation. A tight smooth substrate may require muriatic acid to create a profile for the coating to grab on to. It is not intended for cleaning which may require simple washing to water blast to wet sand blast depending on the condition of the substrate.
 
  #27  
Old 09-20-04, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by anth_c
Jimmac,

Can you describe the how the anti-slip additive affects the surface?

Does surface seem very coarse?

Are you able to kneel on the floor with-out the surface 'biting' into your skin?

Thanks,
Anthony

Note:
I helped instal the Rustolem paint in a friends garage about a year ago (we only used the decorative flakes, no anti-slip material). This was in Houston, in hot and humid weather. The results were great: the finish has held up well to lots of traffic, it also did a good job covering some minor cracks in the floor.
There are several non slip ingredients one may use such as sand, ceramics, and even crushed walnut shells. I would not recommend pre-mixing these into the coating as you cannot be gauranteed even dispersion. The proper way is to broadcast it by hand during the second coat where you would "backroll" it into the coating. There is a product called epotrac that can be pre-mixed and the particles rise to the surface. If you put too much particle in or a highly aggressive particle you will wear your tires over time and of course it will be difficult to kneel on without a mat. Also keep in mind the difficulty in cleaning the floor as it will grip and wear out your mops.
 
  #28  
Old 09-20-04, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by joeox
Hi all,

It's been about 3 months now since I applied the epoxy kit from HD. I think it was well worth the work since my house was brand new and didn't have any previous oil stains. I guess that hardest part of the job was waiting for 7 days for the paint to cure. I do see some chip paint marks in the floor from moving large heavy items. But, I guess I'll have to add another coat of paint in a couple of years. The floor is VERY VERY slippery, so I wished I added the non-slip additive.

Hope this helps.

I totally recommend the kit.
Come back in a year or two and tell us how it stands up. I should hope it still looks good after only 3 months after all you had the benefit of new concrete. This is hardly a challenge for even the cheaper products.

If you really want a good product you have to be prepared to pay for it. You really do get what you pay for.
I used a polyurethane enamel product 9.5 years ago and it is still exceptional. These off the shelf products are mere surface coatings which will fail over time depending on use. The coating I used penetrated deep into the substrate and anchored within the substrate. This of course was after doing proper preparation of the substrate which consisted of years of oil contamination among other automotive fluids. Sure I paid significantly more but I have higher expectations. I need only do the job once as opposed to every two years.
 
  #29  
Old 09-29-04, 08:37 PM
Towbot
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Question Split Coating

OK,
First, the reason I have been using this forum is because it is the only forum relating to Rustoleum Epoxy flooring that I have found. I realize that Rustoleum offers a basement floor epoxy however I can't find any references in the basement forum. I am assuming that both the garage and basement epoxies are fairly similar. (Yea I know don't assume) Question.....if you do half the floor, let it dry, then do the second half, are there any problems? I want to do my woodworking shop in the basement but to get all my tools etc. out at the same time will be, well, at least challenging. No....downright hard due to door sizes versus tool sizes. I want the floor to look decent but aesthetics is not my primary concern , ease of sweeping, cleanup, durability, etc. is.

Thanks,
Towbot
 
  #30  
Old 10-01-04, 03:10 AM
pshimm
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split coating

I recently used the basement epoxy coating in two sepate applications in the same room. It came out great. The only thing you must be careful about is the proportion that you mix the solutions if you aren't going to mix one whole can into the other. I did it by eye and it still came out great--the colors matched between the two separate applications. Hope this helps.
 
  #31  
Old 10-01-04, 02:30 PM
zilos
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does anyone now where I can see the video for installing the rustoleum to my garage?
It came with a video but I dont have a VCR
Thank you
 
  #32  
Old 10-01-04, 03:57 PM
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I've used the epoxy and had it tinted osha safety blue. We've rolled engine stands, hoists, other heavy equipment over it and it holds up pretty decent. The only thing I've noticed is oil stains do not come out. They should make it with a stain resistant finish. Other than that it held up about as good as the concrete floor paint HD carries. If I were to do my floor again I would just use the regular concrete floor paint they carry. It's cheaper and lasted just as long if not longer. POR-15 also makes a concrete paint that is supposed to be bullet proof.
 
  #33  
Old 10-02-04, 02:28 PM
errolholt
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Wink

>> does anyone now (sic) where I can see the video
>> for installing the rustoleum to my garage?
>> It came with a video but I dont have a VCR
>> Thank you

You might find a VCR at one of your local public libraries.

You better hurry, however, before they (and the public
schools) are closed due to a lack of "public" support... <sigh>

Errol
 
  #34  
Old 10-05-04, 02:06 PM
pakelihe
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The video didn't really add a whole lot of information that wasn't in the instructions. Follow the cleaning and mixing instructions and wait the appropriate amount of time after mixing before applying.

Having two people to apply the epoxy is probably a good idea, as one can be cutting in while the other is rolling. We painted our two-car garage in a little over an hour, with total prep/clean/paint time around three hours. The trickiest thing is getting the decorative flecks distributed evenly, and not having a bunch left over or not running out.

Lowes had two different no-skid additives, the Valspar quart, and a much smaller container called Shark Bite. Both mixed with one gallon of epoxy. I used the Shark Bite, as the Lowes guy recommended it, and it was cheaper. It looked like sugar, and appeared to dissolve into the epoxy. After drying, the floor had a very uniform no-skid surface, not at all slippery, but also quite pleasant for bare feet or kneeling. I would recommend the no-skid additive.

Hope this helps.
 
  #35  
Old 10-12-04, 10:40 AM
bigbrowndog
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Did You Fill Your Expansion Joints?

Did anyone fill their expansion joints before applying the Rustoleum product? Considering doing this before applying. I realize it may crack later on. Does Rustoleum recommend any specific product that is compatible (other than cement). I have seen some rubber based fillers in the past, so thought I would check.

Thanks

Ty
 
  #36  
Old 10-13-04, 12:16 AM
ageiger
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Ive had the floor in for a week now. Its a laundry/hot air room in back
of garage. No window, just 1 door.

My experiences so far:

1) Wash the floor with water and a scrub brush, shopvac the water off.
2) Wash the floor with water and mild acid chemical that comes with the kit,
Shopvac the water off.
3) Wait 2 days till dry. Masking Tape walls around floor.
4) Mix 2 parts epoxy, wait 30 minutes.
5) With brush, paint around edges.
6) With roller, do small sections, stopping between to sprinkle flakes.
7) No windows, so put fan in open door, left garage door open all night.
There was a smell, definetly need ventilation.
8) Able to walk on it under 12 hours.

Surface is nice. Only thing I should warn u about is if there is anything
on the floor when you are rolling. For example, there was compound
from when they put the sheetrock up. I tried to remove it when i cleaned the floor and it seemed pretty well stuck. But when I was rolling on the epoxy, some of it came up and stuck to the roller, so keep a rag with you as you work. Other than the pain of preparation, it was a very easy job with
good results.

Note: I read here that it is slippery when wet so I purchased the anti skid
silicate. As I was getting ready to mix into the epoxy, I noticed a warning
on it that read: Proven to cause cancer. Now theres a possiblity that once
its mixed into the epoxy that wouldnt be a problem but I wasnt willing to take that chance.
 
  #37  
Old 10-19-04, 07:04 PM
26T
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Red face color matching

I just wanted to pass on some advice that should be in the directions but is not. I needed 4 kits to do my 24X50 garage. I followed the directions to the letter from cleaning to not mixing ahead. I used the first batch and it went on well. the second batch seemed a little thin but not much. I continued with batches 3 and 4. The next day, Monday morning, I went out to the garage and it was horrible. The batches were all different you could tell exactly where I left one and started the next. I called Rust-oleum hot line and they said "as with all paint when using more than one can you should mix them all together" . Their suggestion was that you mix all 4 cans in a large pail and then pour them back in the original 1 gallon cans. Mix one at a time as the directions suggest. I did that and it now looks great. They did say they will reimburse me for the scond coat. I trimmed mine around the edges with a differnt color and it looks pretty good.

The long and short of it is look here and read up before doing the job, I wish I had.

Update 2 months later: Rustoeum did reimburse me and the second coat after mixing all the color base together and then seperating back to the 1 gallon cans then mixing the activator/hardner went well and it looks good. 1 exception, the chains on the garden tractor/snowblower do leave rust spots. now I park on rubber mats.
 

Last edited by 26T; 12-12-04 at 07:49 AM. Reason: update Rustoelums response
  #38  
Old 10-20-04, 08:58 PM
msink
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When doing trim work with a different color, did you prep the surface again by sanding over top the original? I want to do trim, and some other type things with a different color. How do you do this when it appears you cant paint over top of epoxy, for example, a line down the middle of the floor... Could I use a cheaper, differnt type of paint for the trim work?

Thanks,

Mark
 
  #39  
Old 10-21-04, 08:37 AM
ezfixup
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USE the ORIGINALCOLORCHIPS system

Originally Posted by Trbr81
Has anyone applied this stuff on your garage floor? How has it held up?
I have heard isolated success stories of the rustoleum kits.
stick with originalcolorchips
 
  #40  
Old 10-21-04, 08:47 AM
ezfixup
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www.originalcolorchips.com

Originally Posted by KSU4TC
I just got done painting the walls of my garage and am about to go buy some floor paint.

Hopefully the people @ Lowe's or HD can recommend everything I will need for this project.

I have also heard that you need to get the floor VERY clean.

After I am finished (hopefully this weekend) I'll let everyone know how it turned out.


CHECK OUT www.originalcolorchips.com for
they offer the best options.
 
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