36x60 Gambrel roofed Barn/shop


  #1  
Old 01-12-05, 05:42 PM
eliter
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36x60 Gambrel roofed Barn/shop

I am preparing to build a large shop this upcoming summer and am wondering what to do for the support for the 2nd floor. The shop is going to be a 36 (or 40)x60 gambrel roofed barn type shop with a full upstairs for a woodworking shop (50 psf load rating).

I have plans for framing the roof with 2"x12"x14' from the USDA plans archive, I am not sure if these will pass engineering approval, but from prior experience I think that it shouldn't be that hard to get a structural engineers approval on tried and true plans.

Also I have an option to buy a set of plans for $285 that would limit me to 36ft span but are already signed off by an engineer, and have actual Gambrel Trusses which utilize 2x6's and 2x4's rather than 2x12's probably would be cheaper on lumber but more work and jobsite built.


The sidewalls are to be 14ft tall and the 2nd floor is to start there, I would prefer to have clearspan for the 36-40ft 1st floor for use as a auto shop, however the only way I can see doing that is with either 4 - 40ft gluelambs and running joists perpendicular to them, or by purchasing floor trusses.

This is where a lot of confusion arises for me, which would be the better way to go for cost and ease of installation?

I would have to go with 6x6's or 8x8's under the gluelams for support, whereas with floor trusses I would just normally frame the walls and only use beams where necessary.

So I am wondering if also I'beams for floor would be ok with a set of 2 posts in the center making the span 18-20ft and running a gluelamb up the center...

Anyway any advise would be much appreciated.
Thanks!
Sean
 
  #2  
Old 01-13-05, 12:02 PM
eliter
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OK so does anyone on here have any advice or is this forum pretty much dead?
Sean
 
  #3  
Old 01-16-05, 07:23 AM
S
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Barn/shop

[QUOTE] OK so does anyone on here have any advice or is this forum pretty much dead?
Sean [QUOTE]

Lets see. You’re proposing a project that you are unsure the size of, ”[QUOTE] I am preparing to build a large shop this upcoming summer and am wondering what to do for the support for the 2nd floor. The shop is going to be a 36 (or 40)x60 gambrel roofed barn type shop with a full upstairs for a woodworking shop (50 psf load rating). [QUOTE]”,which in most municipalities will require an engineer's wet stamp “prior” to being submitted for plan check.

You have, as a resource, two available plan options, ”QUOTE] I have plans for framing the roof with 2"x12"x14' from the USDA plans archive, I am not sure if these will pass engineering approval, but from prior experience I think that it shouldn't be that hard to get a structural engineers approval on tried and true plans.

Also I have an option to buy a set of plans for $285 that would limit me to 36ft span but are already signed off by an engineer, and have actual Gambrel Trusses which utilize 2x6's and 2x4's rather than 2x12's probably would be cheaper on lumber but more work and jobsite built. [QUOTE]”, either of which have the inheriant potential of falling below some basic requirements.

The engineer may not be recognized by your municipality.

1) You might want to post this in the Architectural section
2) Hire an Architectural engineer.
 
  #4  
Old 01-20-05, 11:49 AM
eliter
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[QUOTE=Snoonyb][QUOTE] OK so does anyone on here have any advice or is this forum pretty much dead?
Sean [QUOTE]

Lets see. You’re proposing a project that you are unsure the size of, ”[QUOTE] I am preparing to build a large shop this upcoming summer and am wondering what to do for the support for the 2nd floor. The shop is going to be a 36 (or 40)x60 gambrel roofed barn type shop with a full upstairs for a woodworking shop (50 psf load rating). [QUOTE]”,which in most municipalities will require an engineer's wet stamp “prior” to being submitted for plan check.

You have, as a resource, two available plan options, ”QUOTE] I have plans for framing the roof with 2"x12"x14' from the USDA plans archive, I am not sure if these will pass engineering approval, but from prior experience I think that it shouldn't be that hard to get a structural engineers approval on tried and true plans.

Also I have an option to buy a set of plans for $285 that would limit me to 36ft span but are already signed off by an engineer, and have actual Gambrel Trusses which utilize 2x6's and 2x4's rather than 2x12's probably would be cheaper on lumber but more work and jobsite built.
”, either of which have the inheriant potential of falling below some basic requirements.

The engineer may not be recognized by your municipality.

1) You might want to post this in the Architectural section
2) Hire an Architectural engineer.
The plans I have an option for buying are signed off locally and meet codes, the 2x12 stickframing has also been signed off before (a contractor friend's previous clients) on projects. Both plans have worked out fine in past, the engineer's stamp that is on the plans is a locally recognized engineer and if I were to get the other plans looked at they would be looked at by a local structural engineer.

If you read through my post, the reason I am unsure of the width of the building is that I haven't decided on a truss/stickframing method, the truss method is only for up to 36ft span and the stick frame method can be used up to a 50ft span so I would do 40 ft on it.

Anyway this DIY forum seems to be more for "my garage door is sticky" or.. "I want to turn my garage into a room what should I do?" and most of the posters are a little elementary to be of any help I now see.
Sean
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-05, 08:11 PM
S
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[QUOTE] If you read through my post, QUOTE]

I did and because of your indecisiveness, I referred you to the architectural section, where there is a building designer.

[QUOTE] the reason I am unsure of the width of the building is that I haven't decided on a truss/stickframing method, the truss method is only for up to 36ft span and the stick frame method can be used up to a 50ft span so I would do 40 ft on it. QUOTE]

Could this be a commitment?

[QUOTE] Anyway this DIY forum seems to be more for "my garage door is sticky" or.. "I want to turn my garage into a room what should I do?" [QUOTE]

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I always find it refreshing to hear positive comments from those casual visitors that have taken some time from their busy schedules to have actually visited a portion the numerous threads here-in.

[QUOTE] and most of the posters are a little elementary to be of any help I now see. QUOTE]

I am also of the opinion, in the brief time I have been a member, that there are several contributors, besides myself, who could single handedly complete the project you are contemplating.

However, speaking for myself, I would never ask someone to commit to a design advice based upon indecision. I would take those two anecdotal plans, (no wet stamp) and have a material takeoff done and priced.
 
  #6  
Old 01-21-05, 01:26 PM
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SnoonyB is Absolutely Correct

SnoonyB is correct.

A forum of this type is an improper venue to ask for authoritative framing advice when we :

1) cannot see the actual plans and you don't yet have a design
2) Don't know what state, province and subsequent building code under which you are required to build
3) Don't know your Code required structural loads, wind loads, seismic loads and other necessary factors to give legitimate advice
4) Have a questioner, like yourself, who wouldn't know good building advice from bad if his life depended upon it.

The CORRECT answer is that you DO need to get a set of fixed plans, show them to your local code enforcement office (or local architect/engineer) and have them examined for compliance with all the above mentioned factors relating to your local building code.

In short, 2x12s (depending on the grade and species) will generally NOT span the distances you have in mind even at 12" on center, and the only sound way to have a free standing structure of this width is with pre-fabricated building trusses.

You also have a problem with the overall height of the walls, which at 14 feet or more, will need to be built using 2x8s or greater to bear the weight of the roof and floor structure.

The Bottom line is you do need an architect and an engineer for this design, and if you cannot understand that, the problem is entirely your own.
 
 

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