Sweating garage floor

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Old 03-13-06, 11:08 AM
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Sweating garage floor

My garage floor likes to sweat when the humidity is high. It doesn't matter what time of the year it is, or what the tempmay be, moisture collects on top of my garage floor. I have left the back open to help ventilate the garage and that does not help. My house and garage were built in 1978. Not all of the floor sweats and collects moisture.

What can I do to prevent this and what should I use? I thought about putting a sealant down, but I was told it wouldn't penetrate enough to make a difference. Tearing up the floor and replacing it with a new one is out of the budget.

TIA
 

Last edited by Aaron's 00 TA; 03-13-06 at 11:25 AM.
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Old 03-14-06, 07:30 AM
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Do you think its from underneath or from above? To find out, take a piece of plastic or aluminum foil, and put it down on the floor and seal around the edges with duct tape. Leave it for a couple of days. When you pull it up, if there is moisture on the underside, you know its coming from under the slab. If not, its simply moisture condensing on the cold concrete slab (mine does this when its humid and the slab is cold). If its this, nothing really you can do other than dehumidify the garage. If from below, maybe one of the concrete experts on here can advise you more.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 01:18 PM
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I put some aluminum foil down and duct taped all 4 sides. The moisture is definetly coming from below. There was no moisture on top of the foil, or on any of the garage floor, except under the foil. So what do I do now?

I laid the foil down last Thursday and we have had a mix of temps. Anywhere from 60's to the teens and snow today.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 01:35 PM
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Unfortunately I don't have any suggestions for you, other than to make sure the drainage around the garage flows away from it to try to keep water from collecting around/under the slab. Other than that, hopefully one of the concrete experts on here will have a suggestion. I think any coatings would just end up blistering.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 06:39 PM
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There are a few products able to handle the problem, but they are intended for vertical application. You would have scarify the floor, apply the cementious negative side moisture barrier, then apply a coating to protect that. If it is worth all that trouble, I can make specific recommendations (probably around 5 bucks a SqFt, total)
 
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Old 03-22-06, 01:29 PM
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How much $$ are we taking? I was thinking that radiant heating would fix the problem.
 
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Old 03-25-06, 05:38 PM
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floor moisture

You could try a siloxane based penetrating concrete sealer. This is different from a normal sealer. It penetrates the concrete and reacts with free lime to produce a substance that hardens and fills the empty pores. This blocks the migration of water from below to the surface. Call a concrete/masonry supply store and ask about it. I've never used it but heard it works and actually strenghtens concrete. I heard it's pretty expensive too compared to regular sealers.
 
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Old 03-25-06, 07:55 PM
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Siloxanes and surface sealers will not solve the problem. They are designed to disallow moisture from penetrating through them into the slab. If there is no moisture barrier under the slab (the usual cause of slab sweating), then putting a surface or siloxane sealer will not help and may cause spalling (in the case of the siloxane). The surface sealer will certainly blister and fail. Radiant heating will remove the moisture as it appears, which may well be the cheapest solution.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 09:32 PM
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