Garage Door Trim Boards


  #1  
Old 07-31-06, 01:26 PM
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Garage Door Trim Boards

I'm DIYing a big addition on my house, but I subbed out the siding. Right now I've got 2x6 stud walls with 1/2" CDX plywood for all the walls including the attached garage. The contractor wants to nail up 2x8 fascia to this before he wraps it. Is this necessary? Why couldn't we just wrap & trim directly to the stud wall? I've always seen this as pressure treat, but he wants it to be normal untreated pine so it doesn't corrode the flashing (makes sense); is there a requirement for pressure treat or is untreated pine the best way to go?

The RO for the doors are 7'-0 1/4" tall by 9'-0 1/4" wide and 7'-0 1/4" x 8'-11 1/2" before the trim.



Thanks!
 

Last edited by grover; 07-31-06 at 01:46 PM.
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Old 07-31-06, 01:41 PM
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Garage Door Trim Boards

You could use a separator material between the treated material and the flashing or use a different type of flashing.

Maybe he does not want to buy more different nails (LOL).

Dick
 
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Old 07-31-06, 01:48 PM
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LOL! Really, I figure there MUST be a reason for the boards, otherwise the builders wouldn't bother- is it a matter of worksmanship and tolerances, and having a nice smooth spot to nail the trim to? I framed this up with the intention of putting trim directly on it, so it *should* be in pretty good shape already.

He wants me to buy the boards tonight to have on site tomorrow, so I'm going to have to make a decision soon...
 

Last edited by grover; 07-31-06 at 02:32 PM.
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Old 07-31-06, 04:36 PM
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I drafted up a sketch of what I'm talking about. The red is the wall structure, the yellow is trim & weather stripping and cyan is the garage door and bracket. The green boards are the 2x6 buck, and in the 2nd sketch, the board the siding contractor wants to use that I don't think is necessary. Is that the accepted standard way of framing in a garage door or will my way work just as well and not steal 3" of space from my garage door?

 
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Old 07-31-06, 04:59 PM
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It looks to me like any additional framing would be pointless. If the rough opening is already 9' wide, there's no reason to make it smaller. If it was me, I'd trim the exterior edge of the opening with a 2x2 and then clad it with trim coil.

If your rough opening was 9' 3" wide, then yes, it would need an additional jamb liner. Your siding guy probably just wants something smooth over the rough opening, in the event that your sheathing might be a little rough around the edges.
 
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Old 08-06-06, 12:56 PM
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Just feeling the need to point something out to you...

Architects/designers/framers can't be bothered to notice this - but your 5 sided opening for the garage door isn't framed correctly.

As is currently framed, you'll never get a decent seal, and face a continual problem of weatherstrip folding under resulting in tearing.

http://www.garaga.com/faq-answer.aspx?i=11 <- although specific to arched openings, this is how 5 sided (like yours) openings should also be framed, leaving at least 2" behind the corners/arch to allow weatherstrip to be properly installed.
 
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Old 08-06-06, 07:27 PM
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That article says arches have to be done like that because the weather stripping isn't flexible- couldn't it be mitered to properly fit a 5-sided opening?
 
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Old 08-06-06, 07:35 PM
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Garaga's is inflexible - most other brands are - but the framing still applies.

Problem with the 45'd corners is first, usually you're crossing the embossed panels. Secondly as the door lifts, the weatherstrip across the 45's will tuck under (it's not designed to fold that way) and tear.

Same thing occurs on the arched openings.

Going by the pictures, you'd be easily able to correct the problem - in a year once it's completely sided, cladded and you've replaced the weatherstrip 2-3 times... It'd be much more involved.
 
 

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