Floor over garage puddles


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Old 08-25-06, 04:01 PM
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Floor over garage puddles

Sorry, I'm new here and may not be using the site exactly right. I've just moved into a house with a garage that has more than "wet" floors when it rains; it has pools of water. Looks uncorrectable (I think water comes up through the concrete in addition to coming in from outside the house). I want to use half the garage for workshop which needs a dry floor for wood and some heavy tools. Would it work to put down treated 2x4s and lay plywood over them? Will the plywood warp at all from dampness underneath or weight on top? Are there better ideas that aren't too costly? Thanks much.
 
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Old 08-25-06, 05:00 PM
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Covering up moisture issues is not a good idea. Trapped moisture beneath sleeper floor system would cause mold and mildew problems and associated odor problems. Moisture issues need to be addressed first. Gutters and downspouts should be clear and carry water away from structure. Splash guards do not carry water far enough away from structure. Soil should slope to carry water away. Perforated drain pipe can be installed along slab to carry away excess water. Concrete is porous and needs to be sealed with penetrating sealer.
 
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Old 08-25-06, 05:40 PM
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Floor over garage puddles

Since you have pubbles of water, some of the source may be from surface water. Follow the standard suggestions about drainage correction and diversion.

Your concrete slab may be "porous" (incorrect term), but will transmit far less moisture than you can get through wood surrounding the work area. When the water leaks in from the exterior, the slab can absorb it.

You would be best to store your wood in a normal method to provide air circulation and prevent warping. Avoid drastic changes in the air if you are storing for a long period.

Dick
 
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Old 08-29-06, 08:38 AM
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Fix your drainage problems first. Unless you live at the bottom of an earthen bowl, you should be able to keep your garage floor dry. Bad gutters and short downspouts are the first culprits, and easy to fix. Downspouts should be at least 5-6 feet from the foundation, and more is better. Go outside when it's raining hard, and look at your gutters. Is water spilling out of them, instead of going through the downspouts?

A perimeter drain is also a possibility. You could dig a 12" trench around the garage, lay in some gravel, then perforated drain pipe, more gravel, then cover with sod. Slope the trench slightly so the water is diverted away. Groundwater would much rather run downhill in a clean pipe than slowly percolate into your garage. Give the water a clear path to lower ground, and you should stay dry.
 
 

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