water in garage corners


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Old 10-20-06, 01:16 PM
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water in garage corners

My garage was built with the house in 1952. The structure of it is wood framing with no concrete blocks. Just the bottom wooden plate secured to the concrete flooring. The garage is the same level as the ground outside. I noticed that some water comes seeps in at some corners and at some of the edging. On the outside it has vinyl siding right down to the ground. I decided to take a good look at noticed that in the two corners the bottom plate is completely rotted out. My question is how should I go about fixing this, I assume pressure treated wood and secondly how do I stop the water from coming in? Any feed back would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 10-20-06, 01:25 PM
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water in garage corners

To stop the water from coming in, you should have the grade outside the garage several inches (preferably 6") below the garage slab. If not, the water will come in and the wood will rot again, but maybe not as fast.

Dick
 
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Old 10-21-06, 05:13 AM
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The problem is there is a concrete porch on the back and front that comes up to that level so I am unable to go below that. Is there some type of flashing or perhaps a cement that I could seal the edging from the vinyl siding to the concrete patio and porch to prevent the water from doing this again once I fix the problem?
 
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Old 10-21-06, 02:28 PM
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After you complete your repair and before you put the siding back, you could flash the whole thing with some Ice and Water shield and put some aluminum flashing over it. This stuff really isn't meant to be used like this but it should work (for a while at least). Maybe put two layers of the water shield on. You have to buy a 100 sq ft roll anyway.
 
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Old 10-22-06, 10:56 PM
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When I replace the bottom sill plate, I know to use pressure treated wood but how about those plastic 2x4? Are they just as solid as wood and able to support the same? I would think that would be my best bet because even if water gets in, it wont matter cause that will never rot
 
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Old 10-23-06, 05:36 AM
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water in garage corners

Not rotting sounds good, but you probably have a code/standards problem.

They are not rated for structural applications and the plate carries the weight of the garage walls.

P.T. wood (even the new ACQ type) will probably last as long as you own the garage if you can keep the excess moisture away.

Dick
 
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Old 11-03-06, 01:47 PM
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I too am faced with a similar problem. I have a 1962 vintage garage with a sill plate rotted in multiple places. It seems the ground around the garage would get wet in the rainy season and so the prior owners raised the surrounding ground to keep the ground dry- this in turn drove rain into the garage where it would pool... I have dug and installed a 3 or 4" drainage pipe from the back all the way to the front and have also sloped some of the ground all arond the garage. I also have a large concrete back porch which dumps lots of water by the garage so I installed gutters on the house on the edge facing the garage to help things.


Anyway, are you going to try to replace the sill plate yourself? I've found how-to guides (http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/repair/sill/garage/rotted.htm)..

My aunt-in-law, a supposed civil engineer, came to my garage and felt that I could do it myself...but I'm a little squeemish about such a large structural job...any thoughts on the 'do-it-yourself' ness of this type of job??
 
 

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