Opener detached from door

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Old 02-05-07, 08:13 AM
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Opener detached from door

I have a steel insulated door. This morning the opener detached from the door. It was connected with 2 screws that stripped out of the metal door. I tried to put it back but I can not get the flat metal connector high enough to reattach to the door in the same location. It is almost like the opener pushed too far. Can/does this happen? Is it out of adjustment? Is this what caused the screws to strip out?

Secondly, assuming I can get the connector back to the correct spot, how would I repair it? Just use larger screws? Or is there a better way to attach it?
 
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Old 02-05-07, 11:10 AM
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My GDO door bracket is attached to the door lift arm with a couple of bolts. If yours attaches differently, you you should be able to disconnect the carraige by pulling the emergency cord. Once the carraige is free, you should be able to move it to reposition the door bracket. This is a good time to manually raise and lower the door to see if it is binding. Something caused iot to fail and you need to figure that out or it will probably fail again.

If the sheet metal screws that secured the door bracket pulled out, the holes in the door are probably too damaged to securely attach the bracket. If the damage isn't too bad you could probably gete away with oversized bolts. I would probably install a repair plate on the door (a patch spanning the old holes and bolted to the door)and drill it to accept the door bracket.
 
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Old 02-05-07, 01:32 PM
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I thought about oversize screws but it may be best to just bore the holes all the way through the door and use bolts. This won't be a pretty installation since the outside of the door is white. I guess I could paint the heads of the bolts and washers before installation.

Is there a trick to getting the bolts tightened properly and not compress (dent) the insulated door?
 
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Old 02-05-07, 05:28 PM
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It's me (I'm using a different login). I got home and was able to look at the situation better - i.e. not in a rush as I was this morning. Here's the situation:

The screws are stripped out of the sheet metal. When moving the connecting bracket back to the door, it appears that the carrier plate (holds the emergency release) on the chain is too close to the door. This appears to have caused an excessive upward twist to the connector on the door thus rippping it out of the sheet metal. With the emergency release engaged and the connector against the door (flat), the top original screw hole in the door is about an inch above the connector. There's no way to raise it or push the door down for the holes to line up.

I will have to use a mending plate of some sort and screws since any bolt heads will rub the top of the door frame. I've looked for an adjustment on the opener to see if I can move the carrier plate. The only adjustment that there appears to be is to remove the stop on the chain and place it on different links than it is currently on. It looks like it is off by maybe 2 links. This stop is not loose nor is the one for the other direction. Therefore, I don't understand how it could be out of adjustment. There doesn't seem to be much slack in the chain either.

I need to get this adjustment done before I can reattach the connector or it will tear up the first time I close the door.
 
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Old 02-07-07, 05:03 AM
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Any ideas as to how this opener could get so far out of adjustment that it ripped the door connector out? The stops on the chain are secure.

Please let me know what you think. I do not want to repair it and it break as soon as I use it. I can adjust the stops but how did it get so bad to start with? What should I be looking for?
 
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Old 04-08-08, 10:48 PM
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Post Chain stops?

Make sure that these chain stops are actually what is telling the operator the door travel limits. Usually, limit adjustment screws, are found on the operator. Do not confuse these for the reverse adjustment sensitivity.

If the bracket ripped right off the section, I would thru-bolt the connection, and make holes for additional thru bolts, if needed. When checking operator limits, know that you can ballpark it with the door disconnected, then fine tune.

This would be a handy time to check your reversing devices.
The door should reverse, when it senses obstruction.

Hope this helps....
 
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Old 04-09-08, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Doorsmithian View Post
If the bracket ripped right off the section, I would thru-bolt the connection, and make holes for additional thru bolts, if needed. When checking operator limits, know that you can ballpark it with the door disconnected, then fine tune.
I see throughbolting done quite often... And while it works - there is a reason why the manufacturers generally dont design the doors this way...

While throughbolting creates the strongest attachment for the trolley plate - oversized teks or rivets are more appropriate simply because if something was to happen (ie spring breaks, bottom weatherstrip freezes to the floor - the list is endless) The bracket tearing away is cheaper/more easily repaired, than a caved section (due to a solid mounting).

The door companies give us these "weak links" for a reason, and it is in the customers best interest to maintain their integrity...

My .02
 
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Old 04-09-08, 06:38 PM
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Sorry, short on time here...but first of all, what brand of door? Very few allow bolting directly to the door without reinforcment of some sort. You have other issues which haven't been ....oh never mind...I just realized this is an old post with new replies
 
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