storing gasoline in the garage?

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Old 04-04-07, 06:40 PM
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storing gasoline in the garage?

So I had to buy gas today to fill up the lawnmower and now I don't know where to store it. I have a garage with a hot water that has a pilot light so I'm afraid to store gas in the garage due to any fumes. I don't have a shed so the only alternative I can think of is under the deck.....which I don't think is a good idea either. What should I do? The gas is stored in 2 plastic gas cans (one 5 gal and one 1 gal) that we recently bought.
The garage is attached to the house and the hot water heater is raised off the garage floor.
 

Last edited by hurricanefloyd; 04-04-07 at 06:41 PM. Reason: spelling error
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Old 04-05-07, 04:12 AM
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In general, approved gasoline containers are safe to store in the garage. That said, I would not store gas around a pilot light either, just a bad combination. You could use one of those large plastic storage bins from big box to keep it out of the weather under the deck.
 
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Old 04-05-07, 11:59 AM
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Gasoline stored in a proper container is as safe as that stored in your lawnmower. So where do you keep the lawnmower?
If both your containers have a snap on cap on the front end and a screw cap on the filling end plus a seal below the filling cap, then it is as safe as can be. No vapors will escape. You just need to place it where young children can't get their hands on it and away from tools that could puncture it. Leaving gasoline containers outside that is accessable to all is inviting disaster. If you don't want to store the gasoline, then pour it in your car. its no big deal to refill one of your containers at the same amount of gas your mower can hold. Just make sure when you fill the mower, you do it away far enough away from your heater.
 
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Old 04-05-07, 02:08 PM
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Gasoline

Do you park your car in the garage?

Just be sure containers are sealed and as far from the heater as possible, preferable near the garage door.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 10:04 AM
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You need to check on your local fire and insurance requirements.

Where I am to satisfy both requirements you are not permitted to store any more than one gallon or 4.5 litres of a flamable liquid.

This even applies to propane.
You can get one gallon sized propane tanks if you have a need to use this fuel indoors.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 01:22 PM
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Personally I would not store gasoline in any enclosed area that contained a device with a pilot light, approved container or not. I wouldn't bet my life on them being 100% reliable, and the heavier-than-air fumes from one that wasn't properly sealing can travel a fair distance at ground level and be ignited.
 
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Old 04-06-07, 02:29 PM
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This is not the first time I seen messages of water heaters in the garage. One may wonder why they were put there in the first place because car's too can spring a gasoline leak. Does your insurance company know your heater is in the garage? Some people convert garages to workshops and store other materials that give off flammabe vapors. If it were me, I would re-locate the water heater to another part of the house.
 
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Old 04-25-07, 06:26 AM
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this has been studied before

there have been numerous studies concerned with gas water heater heights. The data has resulted in a 18" pedestal specification. Lots of spilled gas, fires and explosions have resulted in this spec. If you are in an earthquake zone, you also need bracing, since tipping and breaking the gas line is a hazard there too. With a name of hurricane floyd, i don't think that is an issue!
 
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Old 05-10-07, 05:41 PM
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I have a new issue,

I store the gasoline outside of the garage but I noticed that the 5 gal plastic container seems a little "bloated". I unscrewed the cap and as I did, I could hear the hiss of air/vapor escaping. I have a 2 gal plastic jug next to it and that did the same thing. Is this dangerous? Should I keep the cap screwed on tight or should I leave it loose?
 
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Old 05-10-07, 06:12 PM
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Gasoline has butane in it which will evaporate when the temperature rises.
You would do well to store the fuel in a shaded area with the vent cap only loose enough to allow the vapors to escape.
The larger cap and nozzle should be tight so the fuel doesn't get pushed up the tube and out of the tank.

Make sure the containers are well covered to keep the rain out.
 
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