Frost Build Up in Interior Garage Wall

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  #1  
Old 01-04-08, 10:56 AM
R
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Frost Build Up in Interior Garage Wall

Hi Guys,

I've got a problem which I've been trying to figure out for some time. On one wall of my garage I have frost/ice build up occurring in the winter. The other wall is free of any ice or frost. I have an insulated garage door, and the house is a cab-over design so there is a heated space right above the garage (and thus insulated garage ceiling), however the two side walls are not insulated.

I assume what is happening is that snow is melting off the cars and evaporating then freezing on the cold wall. However, why the one wall is just beyond me.

I have thought about insulating the walls and putting vapor barrier to try to stop this from occurring, however I'd like to figure out why just the one wall suffers from this problem before I do as I don't want mold build up inside the wall (which I won't be able to see if I cover it up).

Any help or ideas would be appreciated!

Regards,
Richard....
 
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Old 01-05-08, 05:31 AM
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If the wall in question is an interior wall, you could have moisture from inside the house freezing on the wall surface. This would indicate poor insulation or breaks in the insulation. If it is an outside wall, it could be what you suggest but there has to be something about the wall that causes the moisture to condense, then freeze. Sunny side???
 
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Old 01-05-08, 12:02 PM
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If both walls are exactly the same, built with the same materials, sheathed with the same materials, sided with the same materials, neither have insulation... then I could ony assume that either sunshine or airflow are the only differences. If you have a west wind, the west wall (high pressure) would likely be dry, while the east wall (low pressure) would be frosty... due to the marginally warmer humid air being pulled out of the home from the seams of your cold framing and sheathing.

But I'm just guessing.
 
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