Garage Storage - Load Limit of 2x6 joists?

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Old 02-09-08, 12:01 PM
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Question Garage Storage - Load Limit of 2x6 joists?

New built garage (~3 monhs old).

22' D, 16' W, 8.5' Wall Height, and a 6/12 Gable roof. Detached from the house.

I have 2"x6"x16' joists running across the width of the garage, 16" OC.

I want to add OSB to the top of those joists, making a cold storage area in the garage. I'm wondering if I need to double up the 2x6s, or if they will be strong enough.

I don't forsee anything too dense up there, more for packed boxes of decorations, window air conditioners, spare set of car wheels/tires... that sort of thing. And I'm 230 lbs myself - for when I'm up there moving things about.

I was thinking I would need to at least add X-bracing between the beams. There will be Fiberglass batting & 1/2" drywall hung from the bottoms of the joists, along with a few light fixtures of course.

Thanks for any input.

-Nick
 
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Old 02-10-08, 06:06 AM
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I assume this is not truss construction, with collar ties on the roof rafters, 16"OC?? What you describe is not unlike most home attic flooring, but those floors(ceilings) usually have some intermediate support. For light storage, it should bo be an issue, but doubling every other joist would certainly add strength.
 
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Old 02-10-08, 06:25 AM
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Even putting just the OSB up there is going to cause a very disappointing sag unless you first do something to reduce the length of the free-span of those ceiling joists, and doubling them will not stop that from happening. I used to have a similar garage, and I first ran a beam down the center with some posts to hold it up, but I can imagine you would not want to do that.

For what you want to do, I would nail and strap some 2x4s to the bottom side of the roof rafters about three feet each side of center and parallel to the ridge, then add some vertical ties down to your 2x6 ceiling joists. That will leave you with about 6 feet of open width down the center at the highest part, and 5-foot wings on either side. At that point, the loft should hold just about anything you can safely carry up a ladder to get there as long as you do not pack it full or stack any heavy items.
 
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Old 02-11-08, 12:59 PM
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I hadn't even thought of collar ties, thanks!

I think that is perfect for what I'm looking to do. Its not a high use area, and the OSB / Sheetrock will probably weigh more then the stuff stored up there.

 
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Old 02-11-08, 04:02 PM
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Depending upon how that roof is framed, and especially if it has to handle snow loads, be careful to not overload it. If necessary, you might have to add some 6-footers across the top under the peak to help keep from causing sags. The closer you come to trussing, the better.
 
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Old 02-11-08, 04:32 PM
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I am wondering if this garage was built to local codes??? If stick framing with no collar ties, you have a problem in the making.
 
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Old 02-11-08, 08:21 PM
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Peak to wall would only be about 9', and maybe the rafters are 2x6s?

My knowledge of actual codes is minimal, but now I know my "6-footers across the top" are called "collar ties"!

That old garage where I used to rent was 24' wide, and it sure needed them.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 05:34 AM
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Any gable type roof not built with trusses requires collar ties. They keep the roof from trying to push out the side walls as it tries to flatten itself out.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 04:07 PM
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Not to argue, but to learn:

I thought the ceiling joists, as bottom chords, kept the rafters from spreading the walls.
http://www.hometips.com/articles/hom...ollar_tie.html

My assumption has always been that collar ties are only necessary along with ceiling joists when rafters are not strong enough on their own to handle snow loads, and that any additional trussing is primarily about keeping ceilings flat.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 04:39 PM
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With hurricane or earthquake codes, that might be correct, but not in most of the country. Collar ties are still needed, in the event that too many power nails missed the spot, too many roofing layers, too much snow, etc.
 
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