Build a shed or buy?

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  #1  
Old 05-14-09, 03:06 PM
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Build a shed or buy?

I'm looking into building a shed in my backyard. I don't need anything fancy, just something that's about 7x7 to house my mower, wheelbarrow, spreader and other miscellaneous tools like shovels and rakes. Assuming I don't do anything fancy, what am I looking at cost wise to build a wood shed of this size? I'm trying to decide if I should build one or buy one. I was looking at the Big Max shed they sell at HD that's 7'x7' for about $580. Anyone with experience think I could build one for cheaper than this?

Thanks
 
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Old 05-14-09, 03:15 PM
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Build a shed or buy?

What do you want to put the shed on for support?

A 7x7 can be outgrown very fast when you talk about things that get in the way of other things you use at the same time. - When ever you can hang something, that is a bonus.

Dick
 
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Old 05-14-09, 03:53 PM
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Ignoring labor, since you will supply that, yes, you can build it cheaper, but not necessarily better.

But I have to agree, 7x7 wil run out of space before you drive the last nail.
 
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Old 05-14-09, 04:07 PM
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In my brief visit to all of the sheds they had displayed in my local town I was not impressed with the construction. However, they are sheds, it is quick, and you have the rest of the summer to enjoy. A basic shed is a 3-weekend project for someone with some basic tools and carpentry skills. Two weekends with help and good weather. I should qualify that and say help that knows a hammer from a saw horse.

If you are young, this could be a good learning project, but you will not save on cost. Perhaps quality or stlye and certainly pride.

Let us know what you want, there are a lot of very qualified construction folks here on the board willing to help.

GL
Bud
 
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Old 05-14-09, 05:34 PM
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A shed is the perfect project to exercise some green thinking.
Lots of previously used products that are perfectly good on sites like Craigs list. You can save a loy of $$$.

It also the perfect project to hone you construction skills and as Bud9015 ssaid, theres plenty of "very qualified construction folks here on the board willing to help". Not so much with the labor side, but with encouragement and advice.

I say build it. It will be much more satisfying than buying a shed and besides its a great opportunty to enlist the help of friends or family.
 
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Old 05-14-09, 06:01 PM
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I had HD/Tuff Shed build me one. I made the hard decisions along the way and have done a bit of work to it also.
Although Tuff Shed has some patent on their floor, I decided I really wanted it on a slab, so I had that done. Then I also sided it, even though Tuff Shed also uses this engineered paneling for the outer wall. In general I was attracted to Tuff Shed because they do use stud wall construction. So I am confident that the shed is about the same quality as the house. I agree on the size, 7 X 7 is nothing, you will fill it too quickly, we did 12 X 12 and are fairly happy with it.

I will see if I can get some of these pictures to come up.

Here is is being built. Remember we had a slab poured for it, so I think that sped things up a bit, still they had it up in around 3 hours or so. They got it anchored to the slab very well.



Here it is right after they were done, this is what the "stock" shed would look like.



Just an inside view showing the stud walls and how it pretty much looks like the inside of most modern garages as far as construction techniques.



This is MY end of it, note the front wall is not sided yet, this was my first wall! Note on the front wall I have removed the trim strip on the top to get it ready for siding. I learned a lot about siding! Most of it wasn't even the hard way!



Here is a current view, all sided and painted. The trim colors and siding match my house. I removed the Tuff Shed label over the door just to make it seem less, oh I don't know, "corporate"? Filled the holes before paining the trim. I did have to paint the door insert panel (warranty says it all has to be sided or painted, they DID offer to paint the shed also) so I used a color to match the vinyl. I didn't think vinyl on the door would look right. Also note the white flashing under the drip caps, again trying to match the house.
I do have some landscape improvements to make yet around the shed. This was all done last summer (08). Pretty happy with the results.

Gilly
 

Last edited by GillyWI; 05-14-09 at 06:17 PM.
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Old 05-14-09, 08:46 PM
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This is the style of shed I'd like to build.

Tall Ranch - at The Home Depot

Since the concensus seems to be 7x7 would be too small, I'm thinking of going w/ 10x8. I would really like to build it myself, but cost is the number one priority, so I'm wondering if I could build something like this (minus the window) for $500 or less. It doesn't seem like it should cost that much, but as I've learned from other projects, the little things can add up fast. What do you guys think?
 
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Old 05-15-09, 04:26 AM
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I have customers ask all the time if I can build them a shed cheaper than they can buy off the lot. Definitely not. I wouldn't use anything less than standard 16"oc construction, 2x6 rafters, etc. so my construction methods will differ quite a bit from the lot purchased one. This is not to say theirs is inferior, by any means. They are built, generally in a factory setting, on jigs, where stress points can be reinforced on the jig. Stick building is different.
$500 is on the light side. Shingles alone will cost about $250, decking and side wall OSB will be around $160, and you haven't even built it yet, so you have foundation, flooring, studs, rafter system, etc. to add to that.
But, by all means, this is a DIY forum, and if you can DIY, we encourage you to do it. I just wanted you to be aware the cost may exceed your expectations. You will have a better built building by doing it yourself, and you will have the pride in telling your neighbors you did it yourself.
 
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Old 05-15-09, 05:27 AM
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Aly

I agree with Chandler. Building will probably cost more, but how much is pride in a job well done worth to you?

My son-in-law and I are in the middle of planning a 12 x 16 shed for his back yard. I developed a list of materials from the ground up and will price each item and extend the amounts to get the total cost of materials. And I am sure I will omit something in the process, but it will help my daughter and son-in-law decide whether to build or buy.

The shed in your link appears to be about 8x10 based on the size of the door. Good luck with your decision. Come back with other questions if needed.

Ken
 
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Old 05-15-09, 06:00 AM
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I think you can tell that this is one of the annual spring events, advising friends and neighbors on how-to- build a shed. One friend is just finishing his up and another is ready to start.

Look through some of the web sites that sell sheds and pick out some options you like and post them back here. One of the advantages of building your own will be those little extra touches. Once you pin it down, we can estimate the materials for you.

GL
Bud
 
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Old 05-15-09, 10:15 AM
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For those interested in blueprints for your shed project, I came across quite a few free shed plans here
 
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Old 05-23-09, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
I have customers ask all the time if I can build them a shed cheaper than they can buy off the lot. Definitely not. I wouldn't use anything less than standard 16"oc construction, 2x6 rafters, etc. so my construction methods will differ quite a bit from the lot purchased one. This is not to say theirs is inferior, by any means. They are built, generally in a factory setting, on jigs, where stress points can be reinforced on the jig. Stick building is different.
$500 is on the light side. Shingles alone will cost about $250, decking and side wall OSB will be around $160, and you haven't even built it yet, so you have foundation, flooring, studs, rafter system, etc. to add to that.
But, by all means, this is a DIY forum, and if you can DIY, we encourage you to do it. I just wanted you to be aware the cost may exceed your expectations. You will have a better built building by doing it yourself, and you will have the pride in telling your neighbors you did it yourself.
It depends on what you're doing and what kind of shed you want. I built a shed a couple of years ago, and I came out way cheaper and better going the DIY route than buying.

I built a 10x16 shed, 16" OC, grambrel roof, storage loft above, 5/8" T1-11 siding, with cement floor and 8x7 garage door for around $3000.00

Sheds of similar design and size at HD were 5,000 to 6,000 bucks.
 
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Old 05-24-09, 01:40 PM
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I should have clarified from the start. My apologies. I build for a living. The cost involved, overhead, helper cost, all the other stupid costs I figure in a job are necessary for me to breathe above the water line. DEFINITELY a diyer can do it cheaper than the HD ones. Your time is at your leisure for the most part. It's not just the materials, but the manpower used that raises the cost so much. You brought up a good point. And as I stated, your pride is worth more when you DIY.
 
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