Need Help Getting my WoodStove in Compliance

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Old 04-13-11, 03:22 PM
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Need Help Getting my WoodStove in Compliance

I have a Scandia woodstove that was installed in my shed long ago. It is properly vented through the roof with a block chimney. The stove sits about one foot in front of the chimney. I am just now being told by my insurance company that it is not acceptable and therefore the shed cannot be insured because flammables, vehicles, toys, and other fun stuff are stored in there. The concern is possible sparks, air intake, backdraft fumes.

How do I go about getting this thing in compliance. It works awesome, so I hate to abandon it.

If there are no answers, does someone have a suggestion regarding an alternative source of heat I can plumb through the chimney?
 
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Old 04-13-11, 08:54 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Just a guess, but I'm thinking that the problem is the stove itself rather than the way it's installed.

You said it was installed "long ago" -- that makes the stove old. Bringing an old stove up to current standards simply isn't going to happen.

Talk with the insurance co. and see what they say will have to be done to keep your coverage. My guess is that they'll want to see a new stove, or none at all.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 06:03 AM
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Thanks

Figured that might be so, but was wondering if anyone else encountered this problem aand there might be a structural or other solution. I know there has to be old wood stoves out there being used.

Appreciate the feedback.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 09:00 AM
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If there is going to be a solution, it will most likely come from either the insurance company or fire inspector. But I agree with lefty, an old stove and an old chimney may not make the grade. Even though you know what to burn, an insurance company has to pay when some one stuffs the stove with paper and sets off a chimney fire, taking the garage with it.

Bud
 
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Old 04-14-11, 09:13 AM
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I'm thinking it might also have to do with the mixture of toys, gas, oil and the stove all the same place. Could they be separated by a wall and self closing fire door? Would this help?
 
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Old 04-14-11, 09:52 AM
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That's What I was Thinking

I agree and am hoping that if I somehow, easily, separate the items, the stove can stay and still be insured. I have left a message for my agent to try and get some solutions from him.

Thanks for the help guys.

Any additional advise or experience is appreciated.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 10:50 AM
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Code compliance really has nothing to do with whether you can buy insurance. An insurance company is not required to sell insurance for a situation they deem as "risky". My mother had a wood stove installed properly and had it inspected. When she filled out the annual renewal questionnaire she correctly said she had installed a wood burner in the last year and the insurance company cancelled her insurance. She contacted the independent agent and he said the company has a policy to not insure too many "risky" situations. The state has a high population of wood-burners (especially in that area) and they did not any more exposure based on national damage/loss figures. The agent just found a different carrier at a slightly higher price. - The wake of Katrina and other hurricanes has made many insurers make provisions to not get overloaded, so people there cannot get insurance or just have to pay a higher rate because of the risk and other companies have abandoned any new policies in some areas.

Are you doing wood working in the shed?

You can either solve the problem or find a different carrier.

Dick
 
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Old 04-14-11, 10:57 AM
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Looking into That

This is how the whole situation came up. I started looking at other insurance companies and the question of the wood stove kept coming up. You are correct in the fact that several simply denied coverage. I am finding that others require it to be UL listed - which most are not, inspected, and also provide pictures of the stove and surrounding area. Even with all that, there is no guarantee of coverage.

It is my home away from home. I do wood working, mechanical work, etc in the shed.

What is funny is that I am finding that a Torpedo heater is acceptable - which has a potentially exposed flame, but my wood stove is not.

Things that make you go hmmm.
 
 

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