Ideas for moving a building without a floor


  #1  
Old 08-12-11, 08:53 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ideas for moving a building without a floor

I've been told this can't be done, not without spending more money than the building is worth.

I have a 10X12 building I want to move onto an existing 12X14 slab. I'm wanting to use it as a porch. The only problem is the building has a floor, and I can't leave it attached (inspector won't let me use it with the slab).

I've looked online for similar situations, and have seen where a "roller" system was used. But I've been told this won't work.

I'm kind of out of options. We tried using a large "tractor" forklift with extensions, but all it did was lift the forklift off the ground.

I'm enclosing a video of what's going on. Much easier to show it than to explain. Any suggestions, comments, would be greatly appreciated!

20110724144912.avi - YouTube
 
  #2  
Old 08-12-11, 11:18 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,162
Received 408 Votes on 364 Posts
You said the inspector won't let you keep the floor but I would think you'd need to keep the floor attached until after you move the bldg. If you can't figure out how to move the bldg, I'd consider tearing it down and reusing the material to build the porch. Does the slab have footers?
 
  #3  
Old 08-12-11, 11:26 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No, the slab was going to be used anyway for a porch. This building was given to me, and thought "what a great idea" until I ran into the problem of moving it.
 

Last edited by stickshift; 08-12-11 at 12:02 PM. Reason: removed quoting of entire post
  #4  
Old 08-12-11, 11:38 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,112
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
If it's tall enough and has a door big enough....you could back the largest flatbed truck you can find in...jack it off the floor and move it. Of course there's the distinct possibility of severe vehicle, personnel, and building damage. And you sure wouldn't be able to move it very far or on public roads.

If it's wood frame (probably way to heavy for the method above in that case) and you have plenty of time and desire....knock it down and transport the materials you can salvage.
 
  #5  
Old 08-12-11, 11:50 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It's so funny you mentioned the flatbed truck... That's how it got there to begin with!!

Here's the scenario we've though of so far for this:

Cut the nails holding the floor to the frame
Bracing all of the structure with 2X4's and straps to hold it together
Using jacks to lift it up app. 2 inches
Putting galvanized piping under the frame
Using "winches" on both sides of the building, winching each side at the same time.
There's an upward slope, so the building will need larger pipes about halfway.
Once we've gotten the building as far as we can go with the winches, (about 3/4 of the way) using a vehicle to "push" the building the rest of the way, with the rollers still under it.
I know, sounds crazy, but thanks to YouTube, I think it can be done.... But no one else thinks so!!
 

Last edited by stickshift; 08-12-11 at 12:03 PM. Reason: removed quoting of entire post
  #6  
Old 08-12-11, 11:56 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,162
Received 408 Votes on 364 Posts
While you loose some weight getting rid of the floor, I'd be scared not having the floor to hold the bldg together will result in disaster I'd try to figure a way to move the bldg intact and then once it's in place - jack the bldg up just enough to remove the floor joists.
 
  #7  
Old 08-12-11, 12:05 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,635
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I'm with Mark, I think the floor is providing a lot of the structural integrity of this thing and I wouldn't be comfortable moving without the floor still attached.
 
  #8  
Old 08-12-11, 12:05 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,112
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Nothings crazy....just time consuming and dangerous sometimes...lol.

I poured a 10 x 10 slab that averaged about 5" thick (bout 6000 lbs)...unfortunately...it was too close to the property line. Asked a guy with a big backhoe if he could try to move it...no good. Didn't even budge it.

Wound up doing it with round logs as fulcrums and rollers and 5 neighbors on the end of 8' heavy steel I beam fence posts I got free when they were replacing the fencing around my base. Amazing how much force a 180 lb person can exert when it's multiplied by a good lever setup.
They said it would never work...and we all felt like Egyptians at the pyramids when it moved.
 
  #9  
Old 08-12-11, 12:53 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,581
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Just to eliminate the obvious have you gotten bids from a house mover? Were they to expensive?
 
  #10  
Old 08-13-11, 08:14 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,132
Received 352 Votes on 304 Posts
I think since your not moving it far you have a lot going for it. At one time I was considering moving a garage for friend about 20 miles but it turned out he didn't want to buy it. Here was my plan:

Back a trailer into the garage. (Rent maybe)
Unbolt it from the floor (It was attached to concrete)
Jack it up using bottle jacks
Run 4x4 or 6x6 post through the building and attaching to the studs laying flat on trailer.
Building is now supported by the trailer.
Move away.

Looks like you may have to build a ramp or cut out the floor to back the trailer in. It looks high enough you could cut out the floor for the trailer. After you get it supported then beat the reat of the floor off before you back it up.
 
  #11  
Old 08-13-11, 09:14 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
My last shed is a 10'X16' and I can move it to any part of my property all by myself, currently 64 so it isn't based upon strength. As Gunguy said a fulcrum is a powerful tool. Definitely leave the bottom in place until it is right where you want it.

Slide it, roll it, whatever works, I've done both. Just think it through and be safe.

The tricky part I see is when you get ready to remove the deck, as that's when the stability goes all to heck. Cross brace like mad on the inside. I'd probably use 16' 2x10's just above the deck. Be sure you leave enough space to cut between the deck and the bottom plate and attach that 2 by 10 to every stud. Side to side, another pair of 2x10's 16' resting on top of the lengthwise 2x10's.

If you still have that forklift, it would make short work of lifting each end or side so you can remove the base. You can lift one end and tear out half of the base, install cribs and lower to the new support. Repeat on the other end until the frame is resting on cribs. Then work each corner down gradually so the building is always as vertical as possible.

Your job will differ as you work around the adjacent building, but that is where the thinking comes in.

Assuming the shed in the picture is going up onto the slab in the picture, easy. If it's going down the road, that's another story.

Bud
 
  #12  
Old 08-14-11, 02:10 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,788
Received 34 Votes on 31 Posts
Moving Shed Onto Slab

Place 4x4's on the ground running from the shed to the slab. At the shed end, slide the 4x4's under the shed. The 4x4's are the "roadway" for rollers made of large pipe or logs. Pick up the opposite end from the slab with an all terrain fork lift and push toward the slab. May even slide on the 4x4's without the rollers. Just my 2 cents.
 

Last edited by Wirepuller38; 08-14-11 at 02:12 PM. Reason: To correct spelling
  #13  
Old 08-14-11, 05:18 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 7 Votes on 6 Posts
At least the addage, "free and worth every penny of it" holds true . Removing the floor will cause instability, not only for the move, but after it is set in place. Will it be a free standing structure, or attached to the house? If you were ever to get it to where you can move it, cut with a recip saw under the bottom plate and release it from the floor. Of course have good bracing inside. Renting a lull may make it easier to manipulate. Probably $300 a day plus pu and del.
Levers and fulcrums...you can move the world. Who was that, Archimedes???
 
  #14  
Old 08-14-11, 05:56 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 27,192
Received 942 Votes on 860 Posts
A friend of mine moves houses for a living. He's got lots of steel beams that he uses to reinforce things like that so that they can be moved. You'd basically bolt iron to both inside walls (the load bearing walls) which would extend beyond the structure and then jack it straight up. He uses hydraulic jacks, you'd probably have to use bottle jacks. As you raise it you'd raise each corner evenly and you'd stack cribbing (oak or hickory 8x8's or similar) "log cabin style" making a stack under each end of each beam, raising the thing straight up into the air as high as needed. Your cribbing obviously needs to be very level so that you are building it up level and so that it doesn't tip. Once it was high enough you'd cut the floor off, and you could dismantle it and pull it away.

As mentioned, you would need to provide cross bracing once the floor was removed so that the entire building didn't rack as you moved it. You want it to stay square. Cross bracing will help do that in place of the floor, which would be cut away.

At this point, you could jack it up high enough to get a flatbed under it, using steel cross beams perpendicular to the first ones to carry the load. You'd bolt or chain the iron together so that the iron on iron connection is limited from sliding. Once the flatbed was under the iron cross members you'd set it back down and back it up. Having a smooth path with an even grade for the truck to back up onto would certainly help.

The other thing that would be better than a flatbed truck is a mobile home tandem axle trailer, since it is a lot lower to the ground than a flatbed truck. You wouldn't have to jack it up so high which would probably help.

With the proper cross bracing I wouldn't be afraid of cutting the floor off prior to the move. My buddy has a garage about the same size sitting on a tandem axle trailer right now. Being able to drive the trailer inside made that job a lot easier though. you don't have that luxury until you do some jacking and cribbing.

A third way to move it would be by using a steel i-beam as a "train track", and use heavy duty skates (like roller skates for buildings) as the means to roll the building back onto your slab. The steel i-beams would be positioned level and at the proper height so that the building could just be pushed into position with the skates, and once it is positioned where you want it, then you jack it up off the skates, remove the skates and iron i-beams they were riding on, and let the building down. Once the building is set down you'd obviously need to make sure your walls are parallel and that the building is still square and then anchor that sill plate to the slab so that the building is tied down.

Ken mentioned skids- they would probably work too (cut angles on the ends of the skids so that they are like the tips of snow skis)... and if you laid down some 2x12's to act like railroad tracks and then used about 5 or 6 pc of 2" galvanized pipe, you could probably roll it if you could reinforce one end enough so that a forklift wouldn't crush the end it's pushing on... then you could push it/roll it onto the pad. You'd just need to keep picking up the pipe as it rolls off and put it back under the start. Skids work better pulling than pushing so I'm not sure if it would push on the skids uphill or not.

Maybe some of that will give you some ideas.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 08-14-11 at 06:12 PM.
  #15  
Old 08-14-11, 06:51 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,112
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.
Archimedes
 
  #16  
Old 08-15-11, 06:11 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,788
Received 34 Votes on 31 Posts
Levers

Four levers working in unison as rowing a boat. Use a lever near each corner and move the long end of each lever away from the house. The building will move only a few inches, then you move the fulcrums and do it again. Slow but cheap.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: