Garage door misaligned

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-25-11, 07:57 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 115
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Garage door misaligned

I had to replace a roller on my garage door. To make a long story short, in the process it got a little misaligned with the tracks, and when I closed it it was tilted enough so that one of the bottom wheels popped off the track and the wire came off of the spring pulley on that side. I undid the end and wrapped it back around (I did this with the door open all the way).

It works fine now, but it won't close completely on the side on which I did NOT rewind the pulley. I need to adjust the catch on that side, but it's a little bit worn on the top tooth, and the door wants to go up bad enough that it slips off if I lower it so that it catches with the door pushed all the way to the floor. It seems as though the spring is pulling a little harder on that side.

I was thinking about loosening the set screw on the pulley on that side and letting the spring axel slip though a turn or too, but I don't want to make things worse. I am wondering if there is a root cause that I haven't considered, give that I messed it up to begin with. When the door is completely open it sits very straight.
 

Last edited by pporto_22; 11-25-11 at 08:30 AM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-25-11, 08:39 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
I'll assume this is a torsion spring based on your description. A spring wound around a shaft (torsion tube) that runs to each side of the door?

Unfortunately the only correct way to do it is to loosen the spring completely so the door is sitting firmly on the ground. Then you wind the cables on the spools on the ends and apply firm and equal tension on both ends by hand before locking them down. Then you re-tension the spring to manufacturer specs and for proper operation.

Unless you are familiar with how to do this, it can be very dangerous if the spring slips or a winding tool gets away from you.

It's about a 30 min job for someone who knows what they are doing. It could be an hour plus a trip to the ER and medical expenses if you haven't done it before.
 
  #3  
Old 11-26-11, 07:16 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Putting what Gunguy said in more direct terms--torsion springs can easily break an arm, wrist or hand.

I use 2 steel rods, half-inch in diameter and at least 15 inches long, to adjust them when needed. It's important to have a double-spring arrangement on large doors balanced equally. When installing a new spring to replace a broken one, both springs should be tensioned an equal number of turns, starting from zero tension.
 
  #4  
Old 12-11-11, 04:08 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 115
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, guys. I had a professional come and tune it up. Took all of 15 minutes.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: