RV Carport with loft

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Old 12-15-11, 11:31 PM
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RV Carport with loft

We're looking at buying some property in southern mo (near the current river) and wanted to put up a shelter for our camper. *I was thinking of a 36x48x14 gravel floor pole barn with open sides (ie just a roof) to keep the camper out of the elements and possibly a 14x36 storage area/bathroom/kitchenette on one end. *I then began considering adding a loft above but would want it to be the full size of the lower level with a 9' ceiling as a 'cabin' type space for the winter. *Is this something even feisable/cost effective?*

I'd probably be looking at something like 30' posts (assuming ~6 buried), scissor trusts that span 36', enclosed floorspace, etc ...

Would I need support posts in the middle? Complications with this idea? Thoughts?
 
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Old 12-16-11, 06:27 AM
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You are not describing a pole barn. You're building a house on stilts, very common to low lying coastal areas. Is it cost effective all depends on your budget but since you are building a house on stilts I'm wildly guessing you are looking at $150+ per square foot of finished space for basic no frills construction. There would be an additional cost if you want clear span 36' wide and 14' high. It is very doable, it just costs money.
 
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Old 12-16-11, 12:10 PM
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thanks for your response Pilot Dane. Just curious, 150 seems a bit high considering standard homes are around 90/sqft, what additional costs need to be considered for a home on stilts (vs standard frame home)?
 
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Old 12-16-11, 12:29 PM
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That $150 number was a wild guess on my part and it will vary depending on your location and design. But, things are usually more difficult when working up in the air. What would be a simple siding job on a normal house must be done from ladders, scaffolding or man lifts. A good deal of bracing is required for silt houses to keep them from swaying and additional bracing, strapping and bolting is needed to anchor the structure since the wind can get under it. Also the piping is no longer safely protected in a crawl space and is out in the open so it must be insulated and somehow protected. But much of what I'm familiar with is coastal where a lot extra is done because of the high winds.

My parents home while high enough above sea level to not require stilts was built on stilts to give them 9' underneath. It was an inexpensive way to gain all that extra space on the ground level for covered parking and storage. Much cheaper than building a separate building.
 
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Old 12-16-11, 10:16 PM
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awesome, thank you very much for the info!
 
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