garage with leaning wall and sagging roof line

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-20-12, 09:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
garage with leaning wall and sagging roof line

Hello all,

I've got a garage wall that is starting to lean on one side and it's roof line is starting to sag. The lumber is in good shape, no termites or excessive weather damage. I'd like to put it in check and rectify the situation if possible and extend the life of the structure. Do you have any ideas as to what I can do to shore it up? I've attached some pictures for reference that show where and how it is leaning. Thanks for your ideas!

Attachment 4540

Attachment 4541

Attachment 4543
 
Attached Images   

Last edited by Jess Bailie; 10-20-12 at 10:33 AM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-20-12, 09:56 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Welcome to the forums! Is the opposite wall leaning at approximately the same degree? Is there separation of the trusses in the attic part? Your description says "every other rafter has a truss"?? What is holding the rafters without trusses? Anyway you could post a picture of the attic part of this structure, especially the peak where the sag is, and what the configuration of the trusses is? Thanks.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-12, 10:23 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks Chandler!

On the opposite wall, only the two front studs closest to the garage door are leaning inward slightly (see the red line that curves at the end in the drawing). The rest of the opposite wall is vertical. Checked all studs with a level.

As for the the "trusses", i'm a nooby to this stuff and probably not using the right word. I attached a couple more pictures below that show the rafters/trusses. You can see that a horizontal member that extends from wall to wall is only present on every other rafter section.

the three red dots show where they are sagging.
Name:  trusses.jpg
Views: 41014
Size:  44.5 KB

ridge beam where sag occurs.
Name:  ridge.jpg
Views: 16832
Size:  34.7 KB

Name:  IMG_2143.jpg
Views: 13773
Size:  40.9 KB
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-12, 11:23 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,485
Received 29 Votes on 22 Posts
Chandler and Xsleeper will be back to correct me but those are NOT trusses. A truss systems does not use a ridge board and the cross members in that mess are not anything close to what is used with a truss system.

I suspect that the one corner of your garage has sunk and that has racked the entire structure. It is possible that simply lifting that corner will allow the structure to re-align and then you would have to use the proper materials and techniques to ensure it stays in alignment.
 
  #5  
Old 10-20-12, 11:46 AM
bish80's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 334
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
On the opposite wall, only the two front studs closest to the garage door are leaning inward slightly (see the red line that curves at the end in the drawing). The rest of the opposite wall is vertical. Checked all studs with a level.


In your original drawing you mention, that the wall on the left side is "bowed out". Could you explain this a little more. Is the bottom still in line and it flares out at the top, or has the whole wall pushed out. In the above mentioned quote I can't tell which stubs you mention are verticle.
 
  #6  
Old 10-20-12, 11:55 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
the right front corner of the garage floor (near the garage door opening) has some cracks in it and unleveled pavement that would suggest some sinking has occurred there. but the right wall is not leaning; the left wall is. I don't see how jacking up the right front corner that has sunk would bring the left wall vertical.

as for jacking up this corner, I'm at a loss as to how to do it. If it has sunk, the concrete has sunk.
 
  #7  
Old 10-20-12, 12:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bish,

no problem. The entire left wall (with window and side door) is leaning out a the top but still attached firmly and level at the bottom. The total amount of lean measured at the top of the wall is about 1 1/2" from vertical.
 
  #8  
Old 10-20-12, 03:40 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I'm still letting the pictures soak in. Wow. As Furd said, it ain't trusses. The span is too great for the 2x6's as rafters, the rafter to joist tie is substandard. The span of the joists is too distant, even with the ties in place. Having this thing on 4' centers is not good, and could allow for wall push out. You see the bowing of the wood in critical places yourself, so it is obvious it was thrown together by someone with little to no knowledge of how to build a roof system. Personally I would not work in there.
I do like the collar ties, but that's about it.
I know you are worried about that wall being out of kilter, but there's more going on than just that. We'll help all we can, but there's a lot of work to be done to make it safe.
 
  #9  
Old 10-20-12, 05:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Chandler,

The garage span is 24' side to side measured to the outside of the framed walls. Rafters, joists and ridge beam are all 2X6s. Now that I know the term, you're correct. There is a horizontal joist on every other rafter obviously spaced at 48". I thought it was a little sketchy to begin with but you guys are making this sound really freaky (as I type this from within my garage).
 
  #10  
Old 10-20-12, 06:58 PM
bish80's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 334
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree with Chandler with regards to the internal structure of the garage. It appears as though the roof is pushing the wall out. You need more ceiling joists to hold the walls together and the roof from sliding and if they are 24' long you are probably talking glue laminate beams 10" to 12" wide. I would also add more collar ties, but lower down.

If you think of the force on the garage,most of it is the roof pushing down. Collar ties that are up that high have to work a lot harder to hold up the garage.

I never seen 4' centers before, 24" is the most I have ever seen.

Does the building creek when the wind turns up. If so, I would take Chandlers advise about hanging out in there during inclement weather.

It actually looks like a cool project, but one I would only tackle if I had two friends with me who knew what they were doing. I wouldn't blow this off, a 24 foot garage should be cherished.....actually I'm just jealous.
 
  #11  
Old 10-20-12, 07:12 PM
michaelshortt's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Washington State
Posts: 789
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
A 24 foot span on the 2X6's is to much. Would start with a beam or support wall in the center.
 
  #12  
Old 10-20-12, 07:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
everyone, thanks for your awesome posts! I'm attaching a couple more pix for your clarification. Michael, I like your idea of building a center wall inside to create support during the fix.
 
Attached Images   
  #13  
Old 10-20-12, 09:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
plan of attack

Based on everyone's great comments and feedback, i'm starting to generate a plan illustrated below. Let me know what you guys think. Is this sound?

1) create anchor plate on top of leaning wall with 2X6
2) drill eye bolts to anchor plate and into cement floor and attach turnbuckle.
3) build wall or use floor jacks and a beam under sagging joists.
4) tighten turnbuckle and raise joists simultaneously until leaning wall is vertical and joists are flatter
5) add new beams across span to stop wall from leaning out again. Q: what should the dimensions of this beam be? 2X6?
6) add collar ties and/or sister-up rafters as needed. Not quite sure how many ties will be needed and where. I assume lower is better?
7) remove turnbuckle and floor jacks/wall.
8) put my cars in here????

Name:  plan 1.jpg
Views: 13622
Size:  15.7 KB

Name:  plan 2.jpg
Views: 16137
Size:  20.8 KB
 
Attached Images  
  #14  
Old 10-21-12, 03:58 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Your plan has merits and I am glad you choose to do something about it rather than worrying. Your wall idea is good. Plan on a door between the two just for convenience. 2x6 span is 10'6" when using for ceiling joists, so you are a little shy. I would install 2x8's in the alternating spaces across your wall to give added support. You may even want to go in and sister the existing joists with 2x8's. Keep us posted and ask questions.
 
  #15  
Old 10-21-12, 08:08 AM
michaelshortt's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Washington State
Posts: 789
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
After straightening it out you might consider putting some shear panels in all the inside corners. I straightened out my garage and then replaced all the cedar lap siding with 4x8 panels. The siding was bad shape and all the nails were loose from rusting. I jacked my walls straight from the outside using long 4x4's leaning from the ground up to the top of the wall. I put 4x4 posts in the ground to jack against. Your method will work, but I felt better being outside while moving the wall. Seems to me that you will need to raise the center wall while you straighten the outer wall. Be safe as you can.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: