Garage Door Torsion Springs

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-07-13, 07:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Garage Door Torsion Springs

Hello everyone
I replaced both torsion springs yesterday, and wound them the 30 quarter turns recommended. The door would not lift. So I went two more quarter turns and it lifts, but very slowly. My question is, is there a limit how tight these springs can be wound? I'm sure there is, at some point I wouldn't physically be able to turn them, but I'm thinking I need two more quarter turns. Is that too much?
I measured the springs when I ordered them and they are exactly like the old ones, just not rusty. Thanking you in advance for your thoughts.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-07-13, 09:13 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,296
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
When you say that it lifts, but very slowly, are you refering to lifting the door by hand or with the opener?

You should be able to lift and close the door by hand and have a balance point about half way between the extremes.

I personally don't recommend DYI on torsion springs because they are tricky to adjust and may cause you serious injury if a bar or clamp slips.

If you want to continue, adjust for the hand opening and balance point. The opener then should be able to do it's job without stripping gears.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-13, 09:20 AM
Halton's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 337
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I replaced both torsion springs yesterday, and wound them the 30 quarter turns recommended.

Doors come in a variety of materials.....and a wide range of weights.....therefore.......there can't really be only one standard tension setting. Also.....the condition of the track and rollers will affect the ease of operation and needed spring tension.


The door would not lift. So I went two more quarter turns and it lifts, but very slowly.
Slowly how?.....the correct tension setting is achieved when the door has a neutral feel when raised or lowered by hand......and when opened half way it should stay in that position on it's own. Be very careful adjusting the springs.....it can be a dangerous procedure if not done correctly with the proper tools.



EDIT......posted when posting by Goldstar.....

.
 
  #4  
Old 02-07-13, 09:32 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 46 Votes on 43 Posts
Be careful - for the most part, we don't recommend DIY on the torsion springs around here. While they're straight forward, the potential for damage if something goes wrong is tremendous.
 
  #5  
Old 02-07-13, 02:13 PM
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: United states of america
Posts: 70
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I just went through replacing the torsion springs on one of my doors. The original installer did not use a strong enough spring. As a matter of fact, it took nine full turns (36 quarter turns) of the original spring to get the door to balance. I made the calculations for the correct spring, ordered them, and now the door balances with 7 full turns (29 quarter turns). Both the door and the operator are very quiet and operate flawlessly. Since you have already changed your springs, you should be quite aware of the hazards of torsion springs. I found a lot of information on Introduction to Garage Doors . As a matter of fact, I bought my springs from him - had them in three days.

Read through the info on Dan's site. You will need to know the dimensions of your door, the weight of the door, the type of installation (standard, hi-lift, etc.), the type of door (sectional, one-piece, etc.). You will make a lot of trips from your computer to your door for information, but the whole process is fairly simple and very satisfying.
 
  #6  
Old 02-09-13, 11:09 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
well, first, thanks for your replies.
the new springs are on, and the safety concern is the reason for my post.
I tightened them up as recommended, 30 quarter turns, and the door would not lift. It would close at the right speed. I put two more quarter turns on each spring and now it opens, but you have to help it, kind of lightly give it a nudge and it goes up. so I'm just wondering if I can put a couple more quarter turns on the springs safely. Tracks and rollers in good shape. This is a 1970's vintage double door, heavy, very heavy. Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 02-09-13, 11:49 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,107
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you are talking about having to help it when the opener is attached...that's bad. If you mean by hand...it sounds fine. It shouldn't just roll up or slam down with just a starting nudge....it should be as neutral as possible.

It sounds like there may be some roller, hinge, or track issues though I know you said they are fine. Have you checked square on the tracks, checked for level and plumb? Taken every hinge off? Lol...no need for most of that....j/k.

Also...don't forget that weather can affect operation. What's perfect in summer probably won't be in deep winter.

Personally IMO, a quarter turn or 2 is no big deal. I've had to adjust brand new installs 1 1/2 turns more than the manual says.
 
  #8  
Old 02-09-13, 10:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
yes, i'm describing a scenario with the electric opener hooked up and running, whcih is also a 40 year old machine, but before the springs broke, worked perfectly fine..........

I'm concerned if I tighten down these springs more than the recommended turns I'll compromise them and they will break, which I'd want to avoid since I paid $100 for them......
 
  #9  
Old 02-10-13, 12:25 PM
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: United states of america
Posts: 70
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Try this and let us know what you find:
  1. Lower the garage door.
  2. Remove the connecting arm between the door and the operator trolley.
  3. Raise the door manually (if possible) to approximately half way up.
  4. Does the door stay in position? Go up? or Go down?
A perfectly matched spring set will allow you to raise the door up, up, or up and stay balanced when you let it go. On a seven foot door, the springs should be wound between 7 to 7 turns. Less turns will probably allow slack in the lifting cable and more turns will reduce the life of the springs.

Please describe your door - it will help us to render advice:

  1. What is it made of?
  2. Is it a sectional door? How many sections?
  3. What are the overall dimensions? Length? Height?
  4. What does it weigh?
  5. Can you attach a picture of the door?
Torsion springs have four features that describe them:

  1. Inside diameter of the coil. (Usually 1", 2", or 2")
  2. Wire diameter. (Usually between 0.187" and 0.295")
  3. Length of coil. (Usually between 20" and 50")
  4. Direction of winding. (ie. left hand or right hand winding)

Can you tell us the difference between the ones you removed and the ones that you installed? I'll stick with you on this if you like. Also, I am assuming that you have properly cleaned and lubricated the rollers, hinges, etc.
 
  #10  
Old 02-10-13, 03:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 95
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
also, t-springs are easy to measure wire size. your old spring cone will 95% of the time list the diameter.

http://gnlgarage.com/wp-content/uplo.../wire-size.png

the trick to replacing t-springs is having winding bars that fit the winding cones. if youre working on a Crawford brand door i strongly suggest hiring the job out.
 
  #11  
Old 02-10-13, 03:56 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,107
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If the door does not operate manually as has been described here W/O the opener connected...then do not operate it with the opener! You will just kill the GDO.

Find the problem and fix it. 1/4 or 1/2 turn is no big deal.
 
  #12  
Old 02-11-13, 01:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for all suggestions, answers and advice.
This door is wood, sectional, and pretty heavy. I can open it manually, and it is staying up at different levels like described it should.
I have put two extra quarter turns on each of the springs, since someone said an extra couple of turns shouldn't be a problem, and the door is now lifting, it seems to be slower than it was with the previous springs, but I can live with that, and it may be my imagination.
My main question was how many extra turns would be too many on a new set of springs. There's any warranty, of course, but they weren't cheap and I hope they don't break soon because I tightened them down too much.
Thanks.
 
  #13  
Old 02-12-13, 09:04 AM
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: United states of america
Posts: 70
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Generally speaking, you will wind torsion springs one full turn per foot of height of the sectional door plus to turn just to keep the cable tight at the top of the lift. So, if the door is seven feet tall and a standard installation, then the design number of turns would be 7 to 7 full turns. Using 8 full turns to balance the door is not unusual, but will reduce the overall life of the spring (maybe as much as 20%).

I would begin to worry if I had to put 9 full turns on a seven foot door. Not only will the life of the spring be reduced significantly, but also the door will become very springy at the top.

If the door works satisfactorily now, and especially after spending $100 on the springs and assuming that you replaced the springs with ones that were identical to the originals, it should last as long as the last ones did. The next time you have to replace the springs, remember that the most accurate way of selecting springs is to first - weigh the door! Don't assume that the last guy used the correct springs - he probably used whatever he had on his truck that was close.
 
  #14  
Old 02-13-13, 01:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Good point. I assumed they were the correct springs.

School me on weighing this door, please. I'm interested for general info; hopefully these springs will outlive me.
 
  #15  
Old 02-13-13, 01:38 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,107
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you can set a bathroom scale flat under the door....all you have to do is release the spring tension and let the door rest on the scale. If it's beyond the limit of the scale...you have to put a board under the door with one end resting on a block on the scale and the other end equidistant from the door setting on another block so that the board is level. Then you multiply the reading by 2.

Normally this is only done before ordering springs for a repair....too much work on an operating door.
 
  #16  
Old 02-13-13, 02:50 PM
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: United states of america
Posts: 70
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here is a good link to weighing a garage door:

How to Weigh a Garage Door That Has Torsion Springs - YouTube

This is one of the great tutorials that are available on Dan's website.
 
  #17  
Old 02-13-13, 04:42 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 95
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
1000000x's easier to just measure the spring currently on the door, them measure the old springs.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: