Why is the floor drain in my garage sealed off?

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Old 11-16-13, 01:57 PM
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Why is the floor drain in my garage sealed off?

We moved into this house about a year ago, and one of the first things I noticed was that a previous owner had sealed off the floor drain in the heated garage by filling it with concrete. As we live in a northern climate with snow in the winter, we like keeping the vehicles in the garage at night. But because the drain is sealed, we constantly have to sweep out the the water from the melted snow that falls off our vehicles. It's quite an inconvenience.

I'm just wondering if anyone here has ever seen this before, or if anyone knows of any conceivable reason why somebody would seal off a garage floor drain? We would like to hammer out the cement so we can use the drain again, but are worried that the previous owners might have done this for some good purpose that we're not aware of. Any theories?

Thanks for your help.
 

Last edited by Kinibo; 11-16-13 at 02:34 PM.
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Old 11-16-13, 03:06 PM
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How old is the house?

Is the drain in the center of the garage?

It could be that it only drains into pit/rock pit or a tank and it became ineffective, so it was just sealed off because cleaning was impossible.

If it drained to the exterior, it may have drained oil, gas and debris into an open area and was required to be eliminated.

I had a home for 14 years with a center drain and no apparent route to a storm sewer and I always wondered when if would fill up with the dirt/sand from "clunker-kickers" dropping off the car every night. This house was built on a hill side with very solid clay soil that absorbed nothing.

Dick
 
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Old 11-16-13, 03:09 PM
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Could be any number of reasons only know to them. People do strange things.
Could be as as simple as there was no trap so cold air was coming in.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 04:13 PM
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One of the problems with drains is oil or other contaminants that could seep into the soil. The cost to clean that up could be extraordinary. Could be the insurance company required it, just guessing.

Bud
 
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Old 11-16-13, 04:22 PM
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Thanks for your replies.

Concretemasonry, to answer your question, the house is 13 years old and the drain is in the center.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 04:28 PM
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Thanks to everyone who replied. I appreciate it, folks.

So if you were me, do you think it would be okay to go ahead and clear this drain to make it usable? Or would you lean more toward leaving the thing alone?
 
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Old 11-16-13, 04:30 PM
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The homes with the center drains were built in 1974 or earlier. Now, most homes drain toward the door and down the driveway with 8" or so of block showing on the inside. This seems closer to being natural than parking out side, but most people kick the "chunks" off in a shopping center parking lot, leaving it to go down the storm drains. I remember a TV station that had a contest for the biggest "chunk" found in a parking lot.

You don't complain about winter, you just enjoy it in many ways.

Dick
 
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