Building pole barn on low, wooded ground????


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Old 01-28-14, 11:40 AM
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Building pole barn on low, wooded ground????

I am seriously considering purchasing a house on roughly 2 acres. My criteria include either an existing storage building, or room to add one. I found a property that has everything I wanted, except the storage building... The land is 165'x440'

From satellite photos, it appears the whole area where this building could go gets flooded. I assume this is generally in the spring, but I walked the property and could feel ice under my feet below the snow. It appeared the water level could be up to 3 feet deep. They do have a pump installed to move the water, but I really don't want to rely on that if possible. Obviously it wasn't working when the satellite photo was taken.

I am by no means an experienced builder/excavator, so I am hoping one or several of you could tell me how practical or expensive it could get to make this work.

I'm posting the best picture I have of the potential property and apparent water problem... Property is outlined in red, Water outlined in blue and potential building location is black.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]25681[/ATTACH]

Is this a huge undertaking??? Buy the property and make it work, or run for the hills? If I do this I want it to be done right.

Thanks!!!
 
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Old 01-28-14, 02:12 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd think twice before I considered erecting a building where it's expected to flood! If you can't locate the bldg in a higher/drier location, you'd need to build up an area and make provisions for the water to go elsewhere.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 03:24 PM
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Any county is required by FEMA to have flood plain maps. Go down to the local zoning office to check it out. There not even going to give you a permit to build it if it's in a flood zone.
As stated if it's in a flood plain pass on the deal.
The flood insurance premiums will kill you, and it will get old real quick having to move everything and relocate every time it floods.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 04:22 PM
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I've lived close to areas where annual flooding was the rule, and would do my best to avoid the many problems associated with water intruding where it's not wanted. Only if you like the property and its location, and if the price is right (meaning super-low), an option to consider might be to look into bringing in a lot of clean fill to raise the grade of the building site and access to it. While such would normally be cost prohibitive, you could get lucky if you stumbled across a nearby excavating firm looking for a place to get rid of excess material, to minimize their hauling costs.
 
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Old 01-29-14, 04:07 AM
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Don't forget if you bring in fill, the water will have to go somewhere so you need to plan ahead to make sure that won't be an issue for you or your neighbor.
 
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Old 01-29-14, 08:21 AM
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Thanks all. The property isn't all that cheap. It looks like the neighbor already raised his property and that is part of the reason there's so much water. I can see it being a battle for high ground.

I'm almost certain it isn't in a flood plain, but it is a low spot in the area where water can sit. In spring the mosquitos might be a nightmare.

The big downside of raising the area I could see is losing all the mature trees.

Its just frustrating for the wife and I because we like the house, but we don't want to settle and not have that extra storage, especially at the top of our budget. And then to add who knows how much $$$ to bring in all that fill on top of the building/slab cost.

I think I will take the advice of going down to the zoning office and ask about it.

Thanks again. I appreciate the input!
 
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Old 01-29-14, 02:01 PM
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If it's just localized flooding, the zoning office might not know about it. Generally it's illegal to change the grade of your property if it affects water drainage to the neighboring property. Even though the neighbor got by with it, there is no guarantee you'd be as lucky.
 
 

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