Garage Floor slope question

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Old 02-03-14, 07:04 AM
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Garage Floor slope question

Hello,

This is a very dump question. We have an attached two car garage with the size of about 21' X 21'. At a very rare occasion, I measured the slope on both sides of the garage. One side is about 4.5" and the other side is around 5.4".

So I did more measurement in the garage. It seems to be one side of garage floor is a little bit tilt towards the wall, which means on one side, the middle of garage is slightly higher. I also checked the water stain on the floor. I saw on the half side with 5.4" slope, some traces of water stain are towards to the side although majority are towards to the garage door.

Beside one crack right in the middle of garage slab, which has been there since we purchased house six years ago, there is no other large cracks on the floor. Is there anything I should worry about? This is six year old house.

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 07:11 AM
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Unless the crack has changed, I wouldn't worry about it. Does the floor slope upward/downward right past the crack? It's possible the slope was off from the get go.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 07:32 AM
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Hi Mark,

The floor is even on both side of the crack. I also have the feeling this has been the situation from the beginning, but never caught my eye. Do you think I should caulk where the floor meets the wall on the side?
 
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Old 02-03-14, 07:35 AM
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It wouldn't hurt and it would prevent water from getting under the slab but mostly it's just a cosmetic fix and probably not needed other than for aesthetics.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 12:56 PM
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Hello Mark,

Thanks. So you don't think it is a problem if some water gets under the slab, right? Sorry, I have very limited knowledge about the house and I am learning now.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 01:07 PM
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Unless you are regularly hosing out the garage I don't see it being an issue.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 02:43 AM
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I'd recommend sealing the floor-wall joints with a good grade of polyurethane sealant. It will minimize any future moisture intrusion problems, while at the same time cutting down on the (potentially thriving) creepy-critter colonies living down there.

You will be grateful for your wife having no more excuses to shriek like she did when previously encountering one of those "icky things" in the garage.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 05:04 AM
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BridgeMan, would the same polyurethane caulk be good for the crack down the middle of the slab?
 
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Old 02-04-14, 05:58 AM
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slope refers to angle,,, eg, the side of the floor where it meets the wall is ( 4.5"/5.4" ) higher than the low spot of the garage floor,,, I don't know what YOU measured but, if the slope's that much, all the golf balls will wind up in the hole ( low spot ) when they fall out of your bag.

imo, all garage floors should drain to either a grate in the center OR towards the ovhd door,,, a crack suggests there's no joint pattern in the floor.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 07:35 AM
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stadry, Thanks for your reply. The slope is from the back of garage towards the garage door. The design is making sure all water will flow out of the garage. It is not difference between the side and the center of garage.

Since we got some snow yesterday, I spent some time last night to check where melted snow went. On the side with smaller slope, everything was fine. Water went straight to the garage door. On the side with larger slope, most went to the garage door. However at two places along the wall as well as that corner, there were some standing water. I touched the floor and could tell those two spots and corner were a little lower so water could stay. Of course, another issue is water, despite of small amount, did drain to the side instead of going straight to garage door as the other half of garage. It could well be like this from the beginning since I didn't see any other major cracks besides the one right in the middle of garage slab, which has been there since we purchased house six years ago.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 10:29 AM
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If the crack in the middle of the floor is wide enough, then, yes, it could be filled with polyurethane. Thin cracks are difficult for working the polyurethane into, as it tends to be too viscous for them and likes to "gob up" ahead of the putty knife. Also, it's a good idea to install the poly on a warmer day when the crack isn't at its widest (within reason)--otherwise, the stuff will ooze out the top if installed when the crack is wider (at a lower temperature), but subsequently gets narrower as the floor slab sections expand as they warm up.
 
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