Going to finish garage- have a few framing type questions


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Old 03-01-14, 05:11 AM
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Going to finish garage- have a few framing type questions

First of all hello, I have been reading the boards for years, but just recently made an account and this is my first post. Here is the project:

I have a 750 SF detached garage that I want to finish out as a man cave/ getaway/ hangout spot. Nothing crazy fancy going in out there just a place to lounge, a pool table, projector screen etc. I want it to be a place that I can go to think/work, hang out with friends when the wife is sleeping (she is an RN with crazy hours), and also a place for some middle and high schoolers to hang out (I am a student pastor).

I have done an extensive amount of remodeling to the two houses we have lived in so I have a pretty good understanding of the project, and the garage is pretty much a clean slate. That is where I have my question, in regards to the walls. The garage is completely unfinished right now, just studs other than one area of peg board. The walls are 2x4 studs 16" OC sitting on one course of block above ground level. I have plywood siding (the kind that looks like vertical boards) attached directly to the 2x4's, no OSB, plywood, housewrap, etc. With all of that said my question is this: should I insulate the current 2x4 wall cavities and Sheetrock directly to those 2x4's or frame up a secondary wall (which would also then bring me flush with the edge of the block, right now there is a 4" recess) and insulate and finish that?
 
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Old 03-01-14, 07:05 AM
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Welcome, former lurker! With regards to insulating, the question is whether or not the garage will ever be heated. There is no point in insulating an unheated garage. The same could be said for the CMU foundation. If the garage were heated, you might consider insulating the foundation with foam, and furring, but IMO framing up an entire wall just to get rid of the ledge would be a real waste of lumber.

If the garage is not currently heated- but might be someday- well, then that would be the biggest reason to insulate now. You would also probably take the garage doors into consideration. Once you start heating the garage, uninsulated garage doors are going to be pretty cold compared to the rest of your insulated walls.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 04:50 AM
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Thanks for the reply. The garage will be heated but just by wood burner maybe once a week when the garage would be in use. There is already insulation in the attic and I will insulate the walls before putting up the Sheetrock. One the floor I am just going to do an epoxy. Speaking of the floor I have a few questions there as well. Any recommendation on the best type of epoxy coating? Also any advice on what to do with the expansion gaps. This is about a 30 year old garage so they are the old style gaps that are like 3/4 inch wide and pretty deep. Almost as if the floor is made of separate pads. I don't want them filling up with junk over the years.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 05:07 PM
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I have only used the Rustoleum epoxy coatings... I'm sure there are others that would be "better". Whatever product you use, the results will be proportionate to the surface preparation you do.

For the expansion joints, you should blow them clean, then get backer rod (sometimes called caulk saver) that is the appropriate size for the gap. For instance, if the gaps are 5/8" get 3/4" backer rod. If you have trouble finding the right size go to your local ready-mix cement company, they should have the larger sizes on hand. They may also have the best sealants available too.

I'm partial to BASF Sonolastic NP1, but there are other brands that are similar... Bostik Chem-Calk 915, Loctite PL S10... etc. You probably want something in a gray color.

You will make sure the backer rod is about 1/4-3/8" below the surface, then cut a wide nozzle and run a heavy bead down each side, attempting to fill the gap as smooth as you can. Once the joint is filled (but not over filled!) I like to mist the caulking with paint thinner (in a trigger bottle) and then tool it with my finger just to flatten it out and make it slightly concave. On a sidewalk, I'll cover it with silica sand, but if you plan to epoxy, you might skip that. The caulk would obviously need to cure a LONG time before you would be able to epoxy over it.
 
 

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