Free standing patio cover...


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Old 04-16-14, 08:26 AM
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Free standing patio cover...

Good morning all.

I am currently working on a free standing patio cover for behind and ajacent to my home. This is a 10' x 22' cover. I currently have 3 4x4 post next to the house and 3 4x4 posts out at 10' (4 corners and one in center at 11'). The roofing for this will be clear corrugated material and figured I'd have joists at 18" on center. I was planning to bolt together 2x10's for beams along house side and one along exterior side and then just bolt them to the 4x4 posts. I'm starting to question whether this will be strong enough though. The entire weight of the top will be on the bolts I utilize to bolt to the 4x4's. This is in Southeast Texas. Is there a better method to attached this to the posts than what I just described? Since I won't find 22' 2x10's I would have to buy 2 2x10's and 2 2x8's to create one 22' beam the way I figure it.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 03:14 PM
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22' long 2x10s are special order. Piecing shorter lengths together is not the way to fabricate a beam.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 06:07 PM
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Cool. sounds like I should order them. Would it be better to double them up and if I bolt them to the posts, that puts all the weight on the bolts. Wonder if I should consider another method of attaching beams.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 06:47 PM
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Something just occurred to me. If you have a middle post, on the 22' sides, then you don't need a 22' beam. You hang the double 2x10s between the posts on joist hangers, all the way around the perimeter. That way you only have to buy 12' 2x10s & cut them to size. In other words, the top of the 2x10s will be flush with the top of the posts. Then run joists 16" OC, on the 10' side. Brace the posts while you are doing that. The structure will be stabilized when you install the roof. For extra support, use 4" L brackets between the structure & the house.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 08:31 PM
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Ha, I didn't even think about that. Would it be preferable to have the double 2 x 10's attached as one, or just slipped into the hangers separately? And could I get away with 2x6 joists?
 
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Old 04-16-14, 09:12 PM
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You can hang them separately & screw them together later. They aren't easy to hang on a 4x4 post. There is barely enough room to nail the joist hanger, to the post. If no one is going to walk on top, I guess you could get away with 2x6 joists.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 09:54 PM
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No walking on this one. Only thing the joists will support is the corrugated panels. Thanks for the responses.
 
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Old 04-17-14, 04:09 AM
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Don't forget to pitch the roof, for drainage.
 
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Old 04-17-14, 05:08 AM
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Yeah I already have the post at the house at 10' and the outer posts at 8'. more than is needed for sure, but it will definitely drain.
 
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Old 04-18-14, 02:46 PM
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Now I have another question...

I was now planning on using double 2x10's between the 4x4 posts as suggested. But then realized the galv. brackets don't quite work with the 4x4 posts. They need to nail into something wider. I could modify them to wrap around the posts for me to nail into the post, but I'm wondering, can I just use single 2x10's to span the 11' width? I would have 2x6's spanning the 10' between the house side and outward side. Would that put too much stress on the 2x10? Remember, this will have a light weight corrugated roofing.
 
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Old 04-18-14, 04:30 PM
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I have made double 2x10s work on 4x4s. It wasn't easy but it's doable. If you want to use single 2x10s, at least put angled braces under them.
 
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Old 04-18-14, 04:50 PM
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If you're buying 12' stock for the beams, you'd have enough length to put them on top of the posts rather than hanging in between, tied on with a post cap/base fitting, something like a Simpson Strong-Tie BC4, or even better a pair of something like the Simpson AC4Z. (not pushing Simpson here, it's just the first brand I was able to find part numbers to reference by, I'm sure any number of suppliers make similar parts which would also work well). I'd personally tie the ends of the beams together with a large mending plate over the top of where they butt together and triangulate the joints with some 45-degree gussets cut from extra 4-by stock (lagged into the underside of the beams and tied through the posts with carriage bolts) as well, but I am often prone to over-building on my own projects.

Alternately, you could cut some splices from 3/4-ply or 1x12 stock (the exposed edge of the ply would likely get to look pretty ragged after a wile outdoors) to bolt onto either side of the joints (again, this is with the beams sitting on top of the posts, not using wood ties as "hanger" elements), I'd use 7" carriage bolts with at least 1/2" diameter to do it this way.

Tying the whole deal to the house is definitely also a good idea to add some shear strength to the whole assembly (unless you've got the posts sunk at least 3-4 ft into the ground, in which case you're probably OK).
 
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Old 04-18-14, 05:05 PM
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I don't think there would be a choice about connecting it, to the house, if you put the beams on top of the posts. I wouldn't trust it otherwise.
 
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Old 04-18-14, 05:14 PM
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I'm planning to put angled bracing regardless, because I like the way it looks, so it sounds like it should be fine. Just don't want the 2x10's sagging in a few years. Also don't to totally over build either.
 
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Old 04-18-14, 05:53 PM
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I built a deck the way I described, with the double 2x10s, between the joists. It was a few miles from the ocean & it withstood hurricane Sandy. You don't have to worry about rebuilding it, if you do it right.
 
 

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