Can i pour a concrete shed base in sections?

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Old 07-20-15, 08:00 AM
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Can i pour a concrete shed base in sections?

Hi, im planning to build a 13x9 shed and i want to pour a concrete base.

I cant get it delivered because access is no good and i have a load of sand and old concrete for the aggregate i want to use.

Because im planning todo it alone so i wanted to pour it in 4 sections (1m x 2.6m each)

Is this ok?

Thanks
 
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Old 07-20-15, 08:19 AM
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When the truck didn't have access, we used 3 or 4 guys with wheelbarrows to transport the concrete, to the back yard. Do you have any kind of mixer or is it all going to be done by hand? You can pour it in sections. Make sure that it's framed properly. Is there a frost line?
 
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Old 07-20-15, 09:57 AM
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I could do that but i wouldnt be able to use the sand and stones i have and i think id struggle to finish it all properly.

Im in the uk and i believe the frost line is about 1ft but not certain

Should the slabs be poured right against each other or should i leave a gap?

Thanks
 
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Old 07-20-15, 10:03 AM
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Oh and i will be mixing in a wheelbarrow,
 
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Old 07-20-15, 10:18 AM
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At the minimum I would rent a mixer and get a helper if you can. Mixing by hand in a wheelbarrow will be tiring and slow but with a mixer your batches could be two or three times larger and one person could operate the mixer while the other is spreading and working the concrete.
 
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Old 07-20-15, 10:25 AM
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When I was younger I poured some pads and sidewalks mixing the concrete in a wheel barrow About 25 yrs ago I bought an electric mixer and while there are times I wish it was bigger - I would not want to go back to mixing in a wheelbarrow!!

I'd butt the pours up to each other, there will be a crack but that's better than a gap ..... but I'm a painter so if the concrete guys say different .......
 
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Old 07-20-15, 10:39 AM
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know it will be hard work and il probaly get some help but to much hassle arranging to pickup the mixer and then taking it back, im gonna tile over the concrete when the shed us built i think
 
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Old 07-20-15, 11:42 AM
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Numerous, very small batches of concrete may end up with cold joints between each batch which are likely to crack. Those cracks would be transferred up and also crack your tile.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 12:55 AM
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Help designing pier and beam foundation for shed

Hi as per my previous thread i am building a shed (13x9) i was gonna do a concrete slab but i guess building a wooden floor should easier

My plan is to build the floor frame on some concrete/brick piers, but i would like todo as little piers as possible because i only want the shed 10" or so off the ground i wont be able to (easily) adjust any piers that are under the shed.

So i thought id do 6 piers, one in each corner and 1 in the middle of the 4m length, this would give me span of about 2m and 2.6m i think.

Would 9x2's span the 2.6m ? Thanks
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:00 AM
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Here in the USA, lumber comes in 2x6, 2x8, 2x10, etc [actual size .5" less both in width/height] Is a 2x9 readily available at your location? Depending on the use [weight inside the shed] I would think a 2x8 [1.5"x7.5" actual] would be plenty strong enough with 6 piers.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:13 AM
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I merged the threads to keep the single thought process going. No need to go over old ground twice.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:25 AM
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Yeh we dont really do 2x10's etc over here but 9x2 graded c16 or c24 then it goes to 3x**

http://www.easi-timber.co.uk/downloa..._Easi_Span.pdf
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:29 AM
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It will just be used for general storage, tools etc, nothing heavy really.

According to the link i posted c16 graded 2x9 can span 4m on 2ft centers with 0.25kn/m3? loads trouble is i dont know how to workout the loads
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:32 AM
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Here we normally put floor joists on 16" centers but a lot depends on both the thickness/stiffeness of the flooring you'll use and the load set on it. IMO 24" centers would make for too weak of a floor - too much give.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:52 AM
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Yeh i will do 16"

Next issue is i cant get pressure treated 9x2's can i use untreated and then treat it myself?

Cheers
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:58 AM
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Hard to say without knowing the local conditions. Here we use PT lumber anywhere the wood is expected to touch the ground or masonry - it helps protect the wood from both bug infestation and moisture. Has creosote been banned in your area?
 
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Old 07-21-15, 05:59 AM
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Not part of your question, but, here in the U.S. anyway, building dimensions, particularly sheds, garages, etc., even dimensions are more common, say 10x12 rather than 9x13, as it's more consistent with material dimensions, hence minimizing waste.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 06:04 AM
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Yeh cresote is banned here unfortunately

I have some cement roof sheets that are 9ft long and 1m wide, thats the reason for the size of the shed.

Im just not sure whether to order untreated or not, the only treated joists i can find are 2x6
 
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Old 07-21-15, 06:07 AM
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I've built 8'x12' sheds before with 2x6 joists although 2x8s are better. Don't forget the floor needs to be smaller than the roof so the rain water will fall away from the walls.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 06:12 AM
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Yeh i know i could go smaller its just spanning the 8ft between corner piers i dont think 2x6's wud be enough.

What if i go some pressure treated 6x2's and used then between the concrete and the 9x2 joists ? Would it protect them?

Cheers
 
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Old 07-21-15, 06:17 AM
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I've built a couple of 8x12 sheds with wood floors, one with 4x4 posts and another on block piers both of which had 2x6 joists. The one I built for my grandson and his daddy about 10-12 yrs ago is regularly overloaded and it is still doing fine. There are a lot of tools and 2 motorcycles stored in it along with whatever junk they've stuffed in there.
 
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Old 07-21-15, 02:14 PM
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I ordered the 9x2's should be here tomorrow, i cant decided whether to use concrete blocks on the soil as my piers or dig footings/pour concrete and build a brick pier.

Any opinions
 
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Old 07-21-15, 02:50 PM
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A block setting on the ground will raise the bldg up off of the ground but won't give any protection from erosion or frost heave. A footer down to the frost line with brick/block mortared in place will more or less guarantee there won't be settling issues later.
 
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Old 07-22-15, 10:21 AM
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Got my 9x2's today, only just thought ill need some kind of joist hangers, which ones do i need?
 
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Old 07-22-15, 12:29 PM
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Are the 2xs a full 2" wide or they like ours and only 1.5" wide? You'd want the biggest joist hanger that fits, possibly one for a 2x8.
 
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Old 07-22-15, 01:53 PM
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They are 47mm, found some now only 89p each aswell, going to get the blocks tomorrow do you think ill be ok with the lightweight foundation blocks (known as 3.6n over here)

They are the same price and size as the 7n blocks they just weigh alot less
 
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Old 07-22-15, 02:01 PM
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I'm not very knowledgeable about the different blocks but would think the lightweight would be ok. Wouldn't hurt to ask them before you buy.
 
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Old 07-22-15, 02:41 PM
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Ok, any ideas what i should put between the joists and the blocks to stop the timber rotting

Cheers
 
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Old 07-22-15, 03:19 PM
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Maybe a short piece of PT lumber fastened to the bottom side of the joists at the piers.
 
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Old 07-23-15, 01:18 AM
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Ok thanks, any idea what nails i should get or should i use screws?

So many options my head hurts

Sorry for all the questions
 
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Old 07-23-15, 04:37 AM
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Generally 12 penny [3"] nails are fine for framing. They make a special nail for the joist hangers. You'll want to use galvanized nails for the siding and anywhere you use PT lumber.

How do you know/learn unless you ask
 
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Old 07-23-15, 08:56 AM
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Sweet thanks, im abit confused about size my base should be, i hear the the shed should be smaller than the roof.

Do i make the roof frame overhang the shed ? Im doing a lean to type roof

Admin: can you change the thread title to "help building shed" or something pls, thanks
 
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Old 07-23-15, 10:26 AM
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You want the roof to overhang the structure. At a minimum that would be an inch or two on the sides and 6" on the front/back. The more overhang there is, the better protected the siding is from rain. Rain that runs down the siding is looking for a way to find it the inside of the shed IMO the bigger the overhang the better.

The roof gets framed out for whatever size it needs to be. Normally a fascia board is attached to the perimeter of the framing but some skip that when building a shed. The roof framing is nailed to the opposing walls and it's a good idea to install hurricane clips to better secure it. Depending on the type of metal roof and how it's laid out you may need slats/boards running across the rafters to screw/support the metal panels.

Is there a shed you can inspect so you can get a better grasp as to how they are put together? Even looking at a house under construction would help since you don't seem to know a lot about how bldgs are constructed.
 
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Old 07-23-15, 01:39 PM
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I pretty much get it, just with these cement sheets im not sure whether to just overhang the sheets or build the frame to overhang so the sheets are secured to the frame right to the end if that makes sense

Ill probaly overhang the sheets a few inches
 
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Old 07-23-15, 03:39 PM
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The roofing needs to overhang the roof framing a little. How much depends a lot on how stiff/thick the metal is. The further thin metal goes without support, the more it will wobble/flop. An inch is usually good.

I just realized you said cement sheets ?? I don't know anything about cement sheets of roofing but the same more or less goes for it as any other roofing material - you don't want more unsupported span than it can handle but it does need to go past the framing to keep that wood dry.
 
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Old 07-23-15, 04:32 PM
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Ok cheers and yeh fibre cement sheets basically asbestos without the asbestos
 
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Old 07-23-15, 06:14 PM
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Are these sheets normally used as siding? if so, will there be any issues with driven rain getting under them since you aren't likely to have a very steep roof?
 
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Old 07-24-15, 01:11 AM
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You can use them for roofing and cladding, im using feather edge for cladding though
 
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Old 07-28-15, 04:51 AM
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Ok i need some help, i just thought my roof sheets are 9ft long and i guess i want about 4 inch combined overhang for both front and back but surely my sheets arent actually going to cover 9ft with the pitch are they?

I only want a minimal pitch ...
 
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Old 07-28-15, 04:59 AM
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The steeper the pitch, the better it will shed rain/snow but you'll loose more length. Generally for a shingle roof the least amount of pitch that is recommended is a 3/12 [3" rise over 12"] for metal you can get by with 2/12 providing the seams are good and tight. I don't know about the type of roofing you have.

A good low tech way to figure the distance is to take a 2x4 [or whatever] the same length as the roof and set one end on the ground and raise the other end to the desired roof pitch then measure the distance on the flat ground.
 
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