Header size for shed door

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Old 01-19-16, 02:45 PM
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Header size for shed door

i'm building a small shed/storage closet attached to the side of the house. it will be 8 feet wide but only 28 inches deep and probably 7 feet high and shingle roof (its just going be shelves, u can't walk into it)..My plan is to have 2 doors in the front. Will it be ok to use two 2x4s for the door header? the span will be roughly 7 feet for the 2 doors. thanks

Its going to be like the picture i attached
Name:  Attached-Shed-Plans-Free-600x342.jpg
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Old 01-19-16, 02:54 PM
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I'd be leery of anything smaller than doubled 2x6s .... but I'm just a painter, the carpenters should be along later.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 06:48 AM
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I agree, use at least 2 X 6's.
If your going to use T-111 like in that picture it needs to be at least 6" above grade.
Concider making those cross bucks on the door out of 1 X 4 PVC not wood if you want to prevent rot.
Going to have to cut into a mortar joint with a 4-1/2" right angle grinder with a diamond wheel to properly flash that roof.
Big mistake to not have a proper footing or better yet a slab for a floor.
The way it's shown in the picture that sheds going to be moving and causing issues with the roof and the side walls where it attaches to the house.
That picture also does not show any over hangs on the roof, big mistake not to have them.
You'll have far less siding and door rot if you add them.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 04:00 PM
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Thanks for the comments. Our house is made of stucco, i just used the pic for reference. Our roof also has about an 18 inch over hang so it will cover most of the storage shed..The side of the house where the shed will go is all concrete floor so i was planning on using a ramset gun to nail some pressure treated 2x4s to the floor and then building the floor box on top of them and then the walls and roof.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 03:22 AM
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Do you intend to stucco the shed? How high varies by climate but the higher wood is from the ground the less likely it is to get insect or water damage.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 11:19 AM
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Actually you need to sandwich a piece of " plywood between the 2x6s when making the header to make it the same thickness as the 2x4 studs. Adds strength to the header also as a side benefit though not critical in this case.
 
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Old 01-26-16, 02:46 PM
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No I'm using T-11 for sidings..I decided to go with the two 2x6 with the 1/ plywood in the middle. its just a small storage closet so it should work..thanks again!!
 
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Old 01-26-16, 04:02 PM
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Since you are using wood siding, I'd recommend laying one course of block under the stud walls to keep moisture and insects from damaging the T-111.
 
 

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