Garage door header - of sorts


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Old 03-22-16, 04:43 PM
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Garage door header - of sorts

I need to frame out a header for a pole building I'm putting up, and am looking for some advice. The rough opening will be 10' wide x 8' high. The building is a bit unique in that it already has a header, this is more of a 'decorative header'. I need to wrap the OSB around from the outside in so the rolling door hood can have a flat surface to mount against. If I need to draw something in 3D, let me know.

This is the view from the inside. The bottom piece of blue tape is at 8', the top piece is at 8'+22". I want to mount a "header" so the bottom of the header is 8' 1.25" off the ground (allowance for OSB and trim to give a finished height of 8'):



Please note that between the existing header and OSB, there is solid blocking the entire length so that it carries the weight (primarily) of the OSB.



And this is the door I'm having installed - it is fully self-supported by the guide rails:



As stated above, the purpose of the OSB is to provide a flat surface with which to "press" the face of the rolling door hood against.

At this point I'm not too sure if I screwed up with this aspect of the framing. I know a structural architect I can talk with, but figured I'd check here first.

Thanks!

John
 
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Old 03-22-16, 05:14 PM
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Looks to me like all you need to do is slip another 2x6 in there as backing for the header o the exterior side, then put another 6x6 between your existing 6x6 posts, screw it in from the sides with long ledgerloks, a few through the exterior face to tie the sheathing and 2x6 you add to it.

Garage door openings are also often lined with a flat 2x6 applied to the interior surface wall. Not sure if there is any benefit to that if you will already have it lined by 6x6s.... unless it would be to trim and build it away from the rest of the interior wall finish.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 05:32 PM
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What header?
All I see is a top plate.
What I would do is use an OSB spacer on the outside of the header to make up for the gap between the 6 X 6's, and at least a doubled up 2 X 8 jack stud to support the new header and the added spacer.
There is no weight from the area above so a doubled up 2 X 6 with a 1/2 OSB or plywood between them shouldl work as a header.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 05:36 PM
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Ok - that was my what I was thinking, but I kept wondering if I needed something like a LVL, which seems overkill since it will be bearing such little weight - my primary concern, I guess is it bowing.

My problem will be getting a 2x6 (or 2x8) - these are true dimension, and I had exactly the number of 2x's I needed for this project. My source for rough sawn lumber probably can't get me a piece soon enough (and I'd prefer for it to be dry - these pieces were dried for a month+ and anything I get will have a high moisture content). I suppose I can rip or plane down a thicker piece of wood.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 05:44 PM
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You can make up the difference with an appropriately sized piece of 1/2 inch plywood added to store bought 2x lumber.

As an aside, I hope you don't think wood that been air dried for a month is dry. Rule of thumb is a year per inch of thickness to air dry to nominal 12-15% moisture content. That month old lumber is going to dry a lot more.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 05:46 PM
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Why?
Any box store or local lumber yard will have what you need in stock.
There's 0 reason to have to rip anything.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 05:51 PM
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As an aside, I hope you don't think wood that been air dried for a month is dry. Rule of thumb is a year per inch of thickness to air dry to nominal 12-15% moisture content. That month old lumber is going to dry a lot more.
No, I expect it to dry significantly once the building is closed in. But, I took a moisture meter to the wood, and it tested around 12-15% MC at 1/2" deep. I realize the center of the boards will have had some moisture in them, but the entire structure was green wood, so I expect some movement, checking. The boards did lose some moisture from when I received them, and I left them to dry from October through December. I'd have to check my timestamps to find out the exact timing.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 06:05 PM
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Joe, think you missed where OP said the lumber was sawn to full dimensions (really 2 x 8).
 
 

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