how close to put shed to house


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Old 12-02-16, 01:35 PM
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how close to put shed to house

Thinking of buying a shed (freestanding). There are some options that are of 'lean to' style... Was wondering if I am overthinking that putting one of those right up against the house might lead to water issues?

I have an attached garage (under my master BR) on my 1960s split level. Am debating a lean-to right off the garage, set back from the electric meter, of course. Currently, there is a mulch bed and bushes there. I'd have to relocate the bushes

the other option would be a bigger shed, at the far corner of the property
 
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Old 12-02-16, 01:52 PM
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You can always find need for a bigger shed The 1st shed I built was an 8'x12' and I out grew it before I got it finished

IF the lean too shed is attached to the house is one thing but any other shed set too close to the house is a prime area for debris to pile up and the moisture associated with the debris [leaves,etc] will rot the house or shed, maybe both.
 
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Old 12-02-16, 02:21 PM
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It's about trade-offs

Either small shed near driveway (cheap, enough for mower/snow blower and that's about it) NOT attached to house OR an 8x12/10x10 at far corner of my lot. Just thinking it would be more convenient near driveway

Size wise, under 100 sq ft doesn't require building permit (just zoning), and also doesn't require concrete pad
 
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Old 12-02-16, 02:38 PM
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No one has ever built or bought a "shed" that was to big!
In your area I agree a shed style shed is likely going to have snow load issue.
Post a picture so we can see what your seeing where you think you want to put this.
 
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Old 12-05-16, 11:20 AM
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So I FINALLY got a chance to make some images.. This one is good. It shows (not to scale, unfortunately) 3 options that we are now considering:
  1. Remove middle of three bushes--may have to move one more if they need space, put shed along fence with gable side facing street
  2. place shed kitty-corner just off those same three bushes
  3. place shed near that oak tree

Here is the pic:


The challenge is that we prefer to have the shed on the driveway side of the house. As we are on a curving street that becomes a cul-de-sac (we are last house prior to the terminus), our lot is wider in the back than in front. This means the shed is fully visible from the street

Lo-fi example of what it would look like:


I think we are ruling out a lean-to type of freestanding shed near garage
 
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Old 12-05-16, 12:09 PM
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While a small shed may not require a permit it still needs to follow the set back rules. I doubt you'll be allowed to set the shed at the property line.

It doesn't necessarily cost more to build/paint the shed where it will compliment the house.
 
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Old 12-05-16, 02:26 PM
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Yes to what Mark said. Just to maybe clarify a bit, your local building inspection department is the authority for the structure itself, and it is not uncommon for them to waive permits for sheds under a certain size. But that does not mean that local zoning rules don't still apply. The same goes for, as applicable, homeowners association rules. Things that may be dictated by these entities are setback for front, back, and side property lines, setback from the house, size of accessory buildings, including height of accessory buildings, etc.
 
 

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