Dry wall on ceiling of Garage, adding extra beams for support.

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Old 03-20-18, 05:08 PM
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Dry wall on ceiling of Garage, adding extra beams for support.

Hello everyone, just have a few questions about adding support beams to my garage ceiling for dry wall. If you look at my picture there are 6 beams going front to back and only 1 beam going left to right. When I push on the center where the circular light is all the beams will flex. I know it is not strong enough to support drywall without sag. Is there a way to add beams front to back without purchasing the full length beam which is roughly 21.5' long? I am no expert on structural integrity. Could I sandwich lets say 2x4x10 pieces together to make the length? What is my best approach without breaking the bank? Thanks for the input.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 05:30 PM
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No. Not if you are trying to maintain your open span without the use of walls or columns.

From the looks of it, this is a hip roof, yes? The ceiling is quite poorly constructed as-is, and probably just needs to be replaced.. it's hard to say what you should do without knowing more about the roof construction, but for starters you probably need someone to size you a double or triple LVL that will replace your board that goes left to right. You will add wall framing (as a column) on the left and right walls to fully support it. Some areas require steel columns to support LVL' s.

Then you would add joists front to back that sit in joist hangers on each side of that LVL beam, that fasten to the sides of your rafters at the plate along with a hurricane tie to reinforce the connection against lateral movement.

You may also need some additional rafter ties on the left and right walls because as is, it doesn't look like anything was put in place to resist the outward thrust of the rafters. You might want to check how straight the inside edge of your walls are at the top plate by running a chalk line or masons line from end to end.

We obviously can't provide the best advice free of charge via the internet, which is why when it comes to structural questions we almost always recommend having someone look at this for you in person. A structural engineer, trusted carpenter, etc. In most places your building inspector will insist that LVL's need a structural engineer's stamp of approval and a blueprint no matter what. The columns under the LVL also create a point load, so your footing has to be adequate. Yep, one thing leads to another... yes, none of it is cheap.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 05:35 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You've got a tough (big) garage to add a sheetrock ceiling to. The joists that you will be fastening to need to be one piece from side to side..... or front to read. The other good news is due to the span..... they will probably need to be at least 2x8's to span that distance and hold up that weight.

I'm not the pro here..... they'll be by.

(perfect timing)
 
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Old 03-20-18, 05:47 PM
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Thanks for the responses. I should of looked into this more before I decided to re-run all the electrical wires inside the garage. I guess my dreams of having an air-conditioned garage is going down the drain unless I plan on spending some serious money. Has anyone seen anyone sheet rock the walls only and just add foil or insulation to the roof? I'm pretty sure it is not ideal but just a thought.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 05:52 PM
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If you would be willing to consider a partial dividing wall, it would all be possible using standard SPF construction lumber.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 07:31 PM
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For example, in the back of the garage, adding just a 6 ft wall dividing wall and putting a beam across (left to right) that would allow you to use 16 ft joists from the beam to the front garage door wall.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 09:06 PM
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Very interesting, I guess that space can be like an extra "closet" for storage.
 
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