Shed Insulation

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Old 10-25-18, 09:54 AM
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Shed Insulation

I just received my new 12x26 shed and the exterior I believe is T111 but on the inside it looks like some kind of shiny coating.

So I have read about insulating out door walls and there seems to be two thoughts. One is the regular bat insulation and the other is no bats then putting vapor barrier over the insulation.

I also want to insulate the roof and then sheet rock everything.

Will someone please let me know which is better for shed walls that will have the garage door open from time to time and there will be heat/ac there but it will not be on all the time? I will only use heat/ac when I am going to be in there for any amount of time.

Any help greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 10-25-18, 08:04 PM
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First thing to keep in mind is the insulation is going to do very little unless you're heating the structure. After that, it's sort of up to you but modern convention is no vapor barrier and I personally prefer mineral wool to fiberglass.
 
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Old 10-25-18, 08:30 PM
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Your uninsulated garage door is going to be the weak link in the entire thing. Probably should have had an insulated door if you intend to heat or a/c.

But I agree with everything Stickshift said. Also, when you aren't actively heating or air conditioning, the insulation will slow the rate at which the shed gains/loses heat. So say it's cold at night... the shed will stay cool a little longer each morning as a result of the insulation. Then if you throw the door open when it's 75 and sunny, things inside may get some condensation because they are still cool. Conversely, if it's hot in the shed during the day... the insulation will keep that heat in longer at night.

One other observation... I'm surprised there aren't more rafter ties. I see one. Hope there are more that are just hidden by the garage door. Rafter ties are the only thing preventing the walls from bowing out under roof load.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 06:40 AM
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What do you mean by "no bats then putting vapor barrier over the insulation"? Did you mean using faced versus unfaced insulation?
 
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Old 10-26-18, 07:13 AM
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Yeah, I'm guessing by the context that he think "batts" refers to the kraft facing. Chiro, a "batt" is a precut length of insulation, such as stud length batts that are 93" long.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 11:57 AM
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Sorry was in a big hurry when I wrote this and now that I go back and read it I realized I misspoke.
I mean the Kraft facing not batts.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 12:03 PM
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I will be insulating the garage door if that is what you are referring to.

And yes I agree ,when I saw the way the roof was built I became nervous with no joists tying the roof and walls together. They claim to have been building it like this for 40 years with no trouble. I may put a few more ties on there just for my peace of mind.
 

Last edited by Chiro Vin; 10-26-18 at 01:13 PM.
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