Building a lean-to pole shed.

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Old 03-02-19, 08:27 AM
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Building a lean-to pole shed.

Hello, new member here. Looking for advice on current idea for a lean-to pole shed. This is a free standing open building, not attached to any other structure. There are 12 old telephone poles already concreted in the ground from a previous build my stepfather did years ago. He originally used roughcut 2x6s for the entire thing. He had tin on top. It held up well for years, but only half had tin on it. When i moved back, I tore the remaining roofing and lumber down due to not wanting it. Years later, I want to put this up and make it last. So here's the ideas....

- setup is 3 rows of 4 poles, so it looks like 3 large bays, 2 bays are 11-12 foot wide, the other is 17 foot wide, entire structure is about 42' wide x 33' deep x 13' high, plan is open air for now, maybe close off part of it as funds allow
- 2x8s - 2 together with plywood sandwiched in between, set on top of notched poles, large lag bolts (or whatever they're called) through that and the pole
- use different length 2x8s overlapped with additional bolts for rigidity
- on top of 3 rows of headers (whatever those 2x8 beams are called), will be 2x6s standing, 12" oc
- I have roughcut 1x6 in 12' lengths for lathes on top of the 2x6s to attach MasterRib metal to

Any advice, critiques, tips, anything concerning these plans thus far....? I have the lumber purchased already, all 2x6s are 20' long to allow overlap on middle beam, and overhang front and rear for runoff. The posts are already notched for the slope as originally done the first time around. Thanks everyone for help and advice with this. I just wanna do it well.
 
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Old 03-02-19, 10:13 AM
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Not picturing it entirely, but I think you will want to through bolt your beams not lag them... a pair of 1/2" x 8" bolts or whatever length you need to bolt through the posts. Plywood between your beams is really not necessary, that's done primarily to make headers as wide as a 2x4 is. And any splices in your 2x8 beam ought to be done at the post centers.

If your rafters are setting on top of the beams you will want to hurricane anchor all your rafters to the beams. Simpson H1 or H2.5 would be a good choice. Wind will create a lot of uplift on the open side.

12" on center is excessively close. 24" would be fine, especially when you use 2x4 purlins. Add perpendicular blocking between rafters above each beam. This keeps the rafters plumb and prevents them from rolling over as you walk on them.

On top of your rafters you generally use 2x4 purlins perpendicular to the rafters (also 24" on center... some go as far as 32" OC) in order to screw your tin down. 1x6 may not be beefy enough and your screws may spin in it. Plus the screws will poke through it.

Also don't know if your posts wobble or not but often you need some gussets ( like a Y ) from your beam to your post to keep things from swaying if you have an open side with no wall to keep it square and solid.
 
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Old 03-03-19, 07:17 AM
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I think I misquoted on the 2x6 rafters. I meant to say 2' oc. I have 102 1x6 at 12' lengths, 16" oc, of course perpendicular to the 2x6s. I'm not worried about the screws coming through. There will not be a loft or anything for me to be that high up normally anyway. I was told by other guys at work I have discussed the 2x8 headers with, and I originally thought of doing all those beams meeting on top of the posts, but they all discouraged that due to the possibility of sag. I have 20' boards to cover the 17' span and give me the side overhang I am looking for in 1 shot. I was encouraged to adjoin different length 2x8s to help keep sag possibility down. I will upload a couple of pictures later today to help show what I have. The utility poles are solid as a rock, about 5-6' concreted in the ground. I will post the pics when I get home in a bit. Thanks!
 
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Old 03-03-19, 07:27 AM
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Nothing wrong with staggering the joints if your lumber is long enough to span 2 posts and break on every other post... but anytime a joint is not on top of the post, in theory it puts all the load on the opposite member. With nothing supporting that joint, all the bending moment is concentrated right on that one member opposite the staggered joint.
 
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Old 03-03-19, 10:41 AM
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Okay, I talked to a guy at church earlier, and he suggested putting the ends of lumber for the beams against each other on top of the post notches. He also added that I should take an additional piece and run bolts completely through all 3 pieces and the pole to tie it all together. I hope this photo attaches and shows what I have to start with.
Name:  shed 1.jpg
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Old 03-20-19, 06:38 AM
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I've had a thought. After measuring the posts, about 7" in diameter, and looking at having the 2x8s meet on top of the posts and running carriage bolts through the post and a pair of 2x8s, would it be efficient to notch my posts to have a 2x8 on either side of the notch instead of together? By doing that, I see being able to have a flat surface for every carriage bolt instead of going through 2 pieces of dressed lumber but the back of the post notch being rounded. But by going that route, I think I would have to slightly notch the 2x6s that sit on top a little to allow its weight to be on both 2x8s more evenly instead of the first one it has contact with. If i was doing this with trusses, I figured it wouldn't be a problem since it would be perpendicular to the parallel 2x8s. Since it's all a leaning roof, there's a little angle involved, and I don't wanna stress out 1 2x8 due to said angle. Any advice on doing this?
 
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