Old leaning garage

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  #1  
Old 05-26-01, 11:13 AM
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Our 80-90 year old garage is leaning. What's the best way to shore up an old structure? We don't want to lose it.

The garage is made of wood beams, boards and shinges, and also needs a new roof. It has an old-style pull-up garage door (which is out of whack because of the tilt). The tilt is just barely detectable by eyeballing the structure. The structure sits on a poured concrete foundation, and is about -- I think -- 25x25 feet.
 
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Old 05-26-01, 04:27 PM
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Probably the best and simplest way to strengthen the building is to sheath the interior side of the walls with OSB or plywood.

Racking the building (straightening it) can probably be done with a 2x6 just over one and a times the height of the building. First make sure that the bottom of your walls are securely anchored and straight. Then nail a four foot block against the corner of the building on the side the building is leaning toward. Wedge the 2x6 board against block at the top of the wall and drive a 2x4 stake in the ground behind the board. Pull down on the board until the building is plumb (vertically level) and put a temporary 45 degree brace from the top plate to the bottom plate of the adjoining wall.

Repeat that process at the opposite end of the wall.

Nail a small 2x4 block at each corner and run a string from end to end. Work your lever down the wall and push the whole length and gap the string 1 1/2 inches. Make sure that the four foot block is placed over a stud at each point you adjust.

There are a number of other ways to plumb a building if the board doesn't work.
 
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Old 05-13-06, 09:13 AM
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Old leaning garage

How do you pull down on the board? Also there is dirt, regular ground where the 2x6 would be based. Considering the pressure when the 2x6 starts to straighten the garage I do not understand where a stake pounded into the ground will be able to start from not leaning itself.
Frank C.
 
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Old 05-13-06, 11:38 AM
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You can use the 2X6 inside the garage if you can't anchor it outside ( a hefty stake driven deep should work tho) just nail a thrust block to the top of the wall you want to push out and force the 2 X 6 brace up under the thrust block. Fasten another block to the garage floor. Drive wedges between the thrust block and the brace to move the wall out. You can also use a suitable cable or chain with a turnbuckle on the inside of the garage to pull the wall in.
With any of these methods you have to keep safety in mind. I would use braces every 8 feet or so to plumb a 25' wall moving each brace a little at a time. If you use a turnbuckle to pull the opposite wall plumb you have to be sure you have sized your gear adequately and that the cable/chain is anchored properly. Again, a little movement at a time is best.
 
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Old 05-14-06, 07:57 PM
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Old Leaning garage

Thanks for the reply. Your last post to the other group member with the leaning garage is around 4 years old so I was wondering if you would still respond. So I appreciate your reply.
I wish we could draw a simple box type structure but I'm pretty sure I understand.
A few years back I brought up a very deep saddle in a relative's garage which was easy except I had to take one step at a time as I had supports from the floor to blocks that were nailed to every other rafter. I just pounded the supports with a sledge hammer and the saddle went up straight. I did it by having a flat board on the floor of the garage and the flat board went to the bottom plate of the wall which provided the resisiting pressure for the bottom of the support. That flat board on the floor held the support that went up to the block nailed into the rafter and I used a nail in the flat board on the garage floor to stop the support from sliding back. I never did anything like that before but this leaning garage is a little bit more tricky. I bought two "come alongs" so I can attach a chain to them and then the other chain to the top plate but I have never used any of this equipment before.
In this case working on the outside is wise as you remind me to be careful because walls are being pushed back instead of rafters.
From your first post to the other forum member I thought you meant to use the 2x6 to provide diagonal pressure to the garage at the outside corner that is leaning out the most- in this way pushing the garage inward from the front lean and also pushing in from the side lean all at the same time.
I guess I need to get a heavy sledge hammer and drive the stake outside very deep to withstand the pressure from the 2x6 leaning against the outermost leaning corner.
Its hard to get into the garage right away because it has two sliding doors that move across a rail. So you can only get into one side at a time. Those sliding wooden doors cannot open right now because the lean has caused the doors to reach the pavement. In a way this is a good thing because I think it is these sliding doors that are still holding up the garage.

Thanks again.
Frank C.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 05:19 PM
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How much wall area do you have to either side of the two sliding doors? The reason I ask is that once you were to rack the building straight at the front where the doors are...what is the plan of attack, to make it stay true? Is there enough wall area inside, on either side, where you can effectively cross brace or plywood sheath?
 
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Old 05-19-06, 08:30 AM
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Old leaning garage

There is about two feet on either side. Yes, I will put bracing here once I level the garage, along with putting bracing on the other 3 walls. I know a little about "racking" but never involved to where I had to level and plumb a garage.
To rack the corner of the garage, to simultaneously correct the forward and to the left lean, I'm having trouble on how I will take a crobar to put pressure on the lean by having the brace tightened up. I guess I just cannot see myself plumbing the garage from just a 2 x 6 at the outside corner.
Maybe I can pull the oposite, diagnally, outside corner with a "come along" but that would just be pulling the outside corner, not puting any pressure on the rest of the building.
Frank C.
 
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Old 05-19-06, 06:52 PM
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What kind of siding is on the garage and how are the nails spaced? The reason I ask, is your garage very gradually listed the way it is. To try to rack it all at once, without removing any of the nails...or the siding for that matter... may be difficult to do without causing buckling in the siding. You may have to apply pressure a little at a time over the course of days.

If you work with cables, comealongs or turnbuckles...be careful that if something lets go, you aren't in the line of fire of the cable slingshotting toward you. Go slow and check anchor points as you go.
 
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Old 05-25-06, 06:05 PM
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A good description with photos

Check this tutorial out:
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/liftmove/straighten/garage1/winch.htm
 
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Old 05-26-06, 10:42 AM
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A good description with photos

Excellent site referral. There is even a picture of a garage with a horizontal sliding door on rails, just like mine.
I tried to use MS Paint and a photo in My Pictures to give an actual representation of my garage but I could not Copy/Paste either onto this forum's message board.
The hammerzone site is the best site I have ever seen for my particular situation. I had done a search but for some reason the hammerzone site did not come up. My garage is very similar to the one that has the doors sliding horizontally on rails.
I'll study the hammerzone website page and hopefully begin the job.
Thank you for your help.
Frank C.
 
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