cost for 1 car garage

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Old 04-29-19, 08:18 AM
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cost for 1 car garage

I am looking at buying a small ranch but there is no garage- (there is room for a one car)
I am pretty handy but I don't think i can build one- Looking for approximate cost of having the foundation put in for one (if it's needed)- and having the garage framed out with roof- I can do the rest...... Looking for a ballpark
 
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Old 04-29-19, 08:40 AM
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Between one and a hundred thousand.

Seriously, there are too many variables for remote estimation like this; best is to get three or more local bids so you can compare and ask questions.
 
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Old 04-29-19, 08:47 AM
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yup- I figured- thanks... will see i can reach out local company
 
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Old 04-29-19, 09:21 AM
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Don't sell yourself short. I built my first and only garage myself. It is a 3-car with a hip roof. The only part I had problems with was the slab work I hired out. Code required that the old sewer line that ran underneath the site be replaced with PVC. They excavated approx 12', then backfilled and compacted the soil. They didn't do it well enough and after a few years it settled and cracked. I had to pay more money to get it leveled out again.
Anyway. once the slab was done I framed it myself but needed a friend to raise the walls. Then I hoisted the new trusses up and secured them. Sheathing just takes some thought to get them in place. I was 40 at the time.
 
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Old 04-29-19, 10:22 AM
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Between one and a hundred thousand.

Seriously, there are too many variables for remote estimation like this; best is to get three or more local bids so you can compare and ask questions.
Agreed there are too many variables. Get three or four estimates and don't simply pick the lowest bidder. I received an estimate as low as $35k, which then changed to $45k, a second one was $49k-$51k then changed to $55k, a third was $60k, and the fourth was $72k. As you can see, all over the place.

Regardless of project cost, you really don't know what you're going to end up with. Be prepared and expect the unexpected. Several here can attest to the nightmare experience I recently endured with my garage addition. I did not pick the lowest bidder, but things still did not go well to say the least. Be sure to get multiple local references so you can check out their work and speak with the homeowners about their experiences with the builder and the contractors.

The company I selected was well-established and presented themselves in a professional manner, but the crew they sent out to excavate and do other things were inexperienced idiots (they were subsequently fired), and I went through three project managers because the first two were incompetent, as was just about every contractor they sent out to do work, with the exception of the cornice guys. Unfortunately, when it comes to small projects like a garage addition, the larger, more experienced contractors aren't going to be interested in such a small project, so you're left with the smaller companies (some aren't even companies), which often do questionable work.

A couple words of advice to you: design the garage yourself if you are able and be as detailed and specific as you can. Make sure they put your design into a CAD program and you are happy with the result. Insist on a fair and balanced installment plan with at least four payments (e.g. three 30% payments and a 10% final payment after final walk-through). Don't pay until certain stages are complete and you are satisfied. Don't make the final payment until you are completely satisfied and everything is complete. Otherwise, you'll have a difficult time getting them back out if needed. Take the day off and be present when the major things are happening (especially when they are setting forms, pouring concrete, and framing). Triple check the foundation forms to ensure they match your plan. There's no reason why they shouldn't be able to set them to within 1/2" (if not better). Mine were off by a foot if you can believe that. I caught it in time before they poured the walls, but they had already poured the footings, which had to be supplemented. Select the type of materials you want so the addition matches the main home as closely as possible (e.g. roofing, siding, cornice work, etc.)

Good luck, arm yourself with knowledge, and check EVERYTHING (the guys that installed my rafters used the wrong length nails!)
 

Last edited by mossman; 04-29-19 at 10:45 AM.
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