Carport to garage conversion

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Old 05-06-19, 07:09 PM
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Carport to garage conversion

Hi there,

Some years ago I moved into a house that had a carport that had been partially converted into a shed. Essentially the carport was attached to one side of the house, about 2/3 the width of it. The previous owner built a roof extension over the remaining 10 feet or so and enclosed that completely as a shed. However, they never finished it, leaving it with just tar paper. After considering options, I decided to 'finish' the job by enclosing the carport fully. This wasn't too difficult, it involved mainly building a 2x6 non-load bearing wall on the exposed side of the carport, and then some short exterior walls on either side of where the garage door would go. For siding I went with the cedar ciding used on the lower half of our house and the carport's gable. Overall I'm pleased with where things stand, although there is still some finish work outside to do. It has been through two savagely wet pacific northwestern winters - no leaks.

The roof of the carport is basically your typical truss design, however at each end it dips about a foot below the height of the plywood inner ceiling, and this is where it is vented. At the front of the house, this 'dip' is extended all the way across the front of the house to form a sort of veranda. Here's a pic. At the back of the carport, the venting was blocked by the previous owners installation of a third wall for the shed, but would have been venting to open air back in the day.

Here is a side profile drawing I did of it for those curious.

And this is what it looks like today.

The sides are insulated and will be drywalled regardless. But the ceiling is the part I'm not sure about. The ceiling where the former 'shed' is only has a gap of about 6-8 inches from the physical roof to the top of the door. My understanding of these systems based on experience in the pacific northwest is you need a space between your insulation and the actual roof to circulate air, otherwise with our insane moisture you get mold. That is relatively easy to achieve at that part of the new 'garage', although the insulation there will, due to the limited height, have to be physically thinner than usual.

It's the attic space above what was the main carport that throws me. Right now the ceiling inside that part is painted plywood. I don't know if it should be removed, insulation stuffed in between the joists, and then vapor barrier-ed and drywalled, or if the insulation should be applied up against the bottom of the actual roof. I'm also not sure what to do with the parts that dip down, that used to allow for ventilation. There is no gable vent in the roof since these were what was supposed to vent it. Do you just fill the one that's inside the garage with insulation? What about the one that is still on the outside? Or do you fill both, plugging the vent on the outside and filling to the width of the garage, and then install a gable vent above?

Could drywall go over the existing plywood to save ripping it down somehow? Obviously an exterior wall is plywood with typar or tar paper, followed by siding, but that is *outside* the house, the plywood in this case would be inside.

One other side question - currently the upper rails of my garage door are bolted through the plywood into the joists (trusses?) above. What would I need to do to anchor these properly if we drywall? I understand trying to anchor them through drywall isn't a good idea.

Here's a few other pics of the inside to give a better visual. The first pic is of the 'attic space' under construction for the former shed roof. The insulation is just placed there to give a sense of thickness. I'm using 2x2s arranged in crosshatch pattern to keep the height above the door but provide strength to hold drywall.

Appreciate any suggestions:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1OgQ...ew?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/19gm...ew?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1X1-...ew?usp=sharing
 
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Old 05-07-19, 02:28 AM
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Generally it's ok to install drywall over plywood, just make sure most of the screws secure the drywall to the ceiling joists as the plywood would have limited holding power.

Garage door tracks are often bolted thru drywall although that would mean taking the track down and reinstalling after drywall. It's acceptable to drywall around the brackets.

almost forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 05-07-19, 04:40 AM
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Permits? Just wondering.
 
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Old 05-07-19, 08:10 AM
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No, we are in an unincorporated district, no permits are required. Yes, such a thing exists.
 
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Old 05-07-19, 11:35 AM
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Had to ask. Normally Mark would have, too, but he's getting up in years and forgets things.
 
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Old 05-07-19, 08:45 PM
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Fair enough. Yeah where i am they don't generally require permits or even have any zoning. You could pretty much build a medieval castle here if you wanted to.

I did get some help on this initially from a qualified contractor neighbour (who moved away last year), and it does have to be inspected for insurance purposes once done.

The contractor friend suggested just leaving it uninsulated to avoid having to figure out the moisture issues. But it's cold and wet here most of the year and I'd like to stop my car from rusting away if I can.
 
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Old 05-07-19, 09:38 PM
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Actually, cars rust faster if you expose them to moisture and road salt and then put them in a warm environment.
 
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Old 05-08-19, 02:08 AM
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Best way to get rid of the moisture is thru ventilation.
 
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