Removing non-paintable silicone

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Old 08-09-19, 08:24 PM
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Post Removing non-paintable silicone

Hello,

About last year, I noticed some cracks in the wooden board located on either side of the garage. I grabbed the only caulk I had at hand, a white GE silicone II. I figured it would remain white, and was not aware it wasn't paintable. The caulked area was barely noticeable after caulking. I called it a success and moved on. But come this year, I noticed that the caulked area collects dirt and looks terrible. And since paint is chipping in other areas, I decided to paint the whole thing.

There is no dirt is the crack filled with silicone, but surrounding areas around the crack, which is glossy from the caulk smoothing process, seems to attract dust. Of course, I can't paint over it, even with a paint that has a primer in it. So after much research, I figured the best option is to sand it down. I have a 320grit sand paper and my questions are as follows:

1) There is already a coating of white paint. Should I sand it down to bare wood?
2) Do I need to wash off the area after sanding it, or will simply dusting it off be fine?
3) The paint already has primer in it, so is there anything else that is absolutely required after sanding it down to bare wood?

I will do two coatings on that side to be sure.

Thank you.
 
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Old 08-10-19, 02:08 AM
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GE Silicone II is 100% true silicone. Sanding it will not be very effective. There is no chemical that will loosen or dissolve it. Most times you would use a sharp putty knife to remove as much as possible and then maybe a scraper. You may be able to follow up by sanding.
 
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Old 08-10-19, 02:11 AM
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It's best to remove all the silicone caulk although that isn't always feasible, when it's not it's best to coat over the caulk/residue with a pigmented shellac like Zinnser's BIN. Using a rag or duster to remove the dust is fine. You only need to wash if there is ground in dirt/mildew.

It's always best to use a dedicated primer over raw wood.
 
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Old 08-10-19, 04:27 AM
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There is no chemical that will loosen or dissolve it.
Actually enamel reducer, same stuff as goof off, will soften up silicone!
 
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Old 08-10-19, 09:32 AM
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Thanks for the tips, guys. The silicone is primarily inside the wood split, but there is glossy silicone residue on the outside area of the split from smoothing caulk into the split. It is quite difficult to get it out of the split as the split is less than a millimeter in width. I tried 320grit sand paper on a small silicone residue section and I'm finding it a bit difficult to remove, and frankly, exhausting. Might need stronger sandpaper.

GE should be sued for this product. Not because it isn't paintable, but because they label it for exterior use and it collects difficult to remove dirt within months. If it retained its color, or didn't attract dirt, I wouldn't need to remove it as the wood board is also white.
 
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Old 08-10-19, 11:59 AM
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GE should be sued for this product.
So to be kind to GE, there are a lot of better products for exterior use, Quad and Solar Seal are my go to brands.

For interior, probably the DAP brands.

Personally I dont use silicone anymore, especially for bathrooms, many dedicated brands that just perform better!
 
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Old 08-11-19, 02:36 AM
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All caulks that are left unpainted are prone to attract dirt. Caulk is flexible and never dries to a hard finish [at least not the decent ones] It's all about using the right caulking for the right job. G.E. silicone isn't typically used on the exterior where it's exposed to the elements. It's a great caulk for the right application.
 
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Old 08-11-19, 01:21 PM
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Marksr,

Okay, I did not know that(about all caulks attracting dirt on the outside). I only checked the silicone caulk tube to see if it could be used on the outside. GE labels it for Interior and Exterior. But in hindsight, I should have just painted the wood board when I saw the split instead of caulking it. The split itself is very small in width, but long. Painting itself was probably enough to fill it.

Since you are a painter, I have a couple of questions. Turns out the wood board color isn't pure white, but some light creamy type, or maybe even off-white. In a test area, I noticed a difference in texture between the old and new paint. The new one feels cheap while the old one feels much superior, especially when I run my hands across it. It isn't glossy, but it isn't flat either. The new one I bought is a Behr Paint and Primer in one, Premium Plus, Flat. The old one feels like it is oil based, but when I asked Home Depot associate for oil based ones, he said they don't carry them.

Since everyone loves pictures, I have attached two. One showing the difference in paint color, and one showing one of the silicone problem area.

Do you happen to know the color by looking?
Is the Behr paint in Flat okay for this? Or is there a better option or better brand?

Thank you.

--
Siliconed area:

Paint color difference:
 
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Old 08-12-19, 02:39 AM
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The odds are it isn't oil base, it's been decades since they've been used much on exteriors.

I don't know a lot about the Behr coating lines, it's a brand I don't use. Generally you will find better coatings at your local paint store as opposed to a big box paint dept where they tend to stock paint based on low price rather than quality. Is it possible your texture difference is sheen related?

Color matching on old paint jobs can be problematic. Even when you have leftover paint it might not blend do to weathering. Sometimes the best bet is to repaint that section. Your test patch is too light but it shouldn't take a lot to darken it .... but that is usually outside of the scope of most diyers. Is this a trim board surrounding the door? if so, painting the trim boards on each side and above the door might make that paint look close enough.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 07:50 AM
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Marksr,

I will try the Sherwin-Williams right next to the Home Depot.

I am not sure if it is sheen or something else. The new paint feels like paper on the wood board, kind of like the drywall paints used on the interior, but the older one feels much more like paint. I feel like the older one would be much more resilient to stains, mold, etc.

Yes, the new paint is bright white. Too bright. There are trim boards around the door but the current color scheme seems to be a match to the door itself and a plastic trim (channel?) beyond the wood board. That's why I want to try to keep it the same, or approximately the same.

When you say to darken it, you mean a darker paint?

Thank you.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 10:20 AM
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You can add tint or other paints [same type of base] to change the color. It wouldn't take a lot to bring that color closer - maybe a drop or three of black.
 
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Old 08-17-19, 07:54 AM
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Hey marksr,

I ran into an another issue. My fault again. I used interior ScotchBlue tape on the plastic channel-type trim right next to the wood board. I didn't know the tape was interior specific at the time. Decided to paint next week because the paint manufacturer told me high humidity was bad for painting, so I took the ScotchBlue tape off. As I was taking it off, I noticed the tape left glue residue on the plastic trim. I can get about 60-70% off with dish soap and a non-abrasive scrub pad. And perhaps some more with Lysol. But even after taking some off, I can still see the residue at an angle in that section, residue which may collect dirt/dust with time. Hmm, this sounds familiar.

Rubbing alcohol did not work in the least. Lysol seems to work better, but not complete, and I am afraid Lysol's yellow color will stain the white plastic trim. And I would want to avoid painting over the trim.

Is there anything else I can try that is non-abrasive? Any tricks of the trade? This is right next to the to-be-painted wood board and there is probably caulking between them. So I don't want to introduce something that might disturb the caulking when rinsing off. I also want to avoid staining the white trim. Any options left?
 
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Old 08-17-19, 08:57 AM
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Even exterior tape doesn't fare well when left exposed to the elements for any length of time.

I usually use mineral spirits and repaint if needed. Your soap should work but will need more elbow grease.
 
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