130 pound heavy bag in hollow block wall

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Old 12-07-19, 10:56 PM
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130 pound heavy bag in hollow block wall

Hi All,

Warning: This is going to be a long post!

So I've done this before in the old house with minimal issues, but before I do it again on the new house I wanted to see if there was a better way to do this and why it worked in the first place. I feel like if it was done over again there would be crumbling block and probably some form of bodily injury, ha.

The mount is below and it is 4 feet in length, 18 inches high and 16 inches wide.

I used about 10 or 12 5/16 lag bolts to put two 4 or 5 ft horizontal 2x10s on the cinderblock garage wall. Then I used the same sized lag bolts, four of them to mount the thing through the boards and into the wall. The bolts all had lag shields to bite into the block before hitting the void or hollow section. I Also put a bench spring rated for 300lbs on the mount eye hole and put the bag on that, for dampening vibrations and such.

I used it nearly every other day for a year and a half and the only issue was on of the anchors came loose and the top of the top 2x10 so part of that board wasn't flush up against the wall. Nothing seemed like it was going to fail however and when I took it down there were no cracks or crumbling.

The idea for the new setup was to either do the same thing plus better and more epoxy for the anchors... or else possibly get longer boards to do a ceiling to floor frame, so essentially some 9 foot long 2x8s or 10s with a slight gap between them. I found some fliptoggle bolts that say they are rated for 600 pounds in cinderblock (which frankly I find pretty unbelievable). I'd probably add in some lag bolts and shields into the solid midsection of the block, probably smaller than 5/16. I've heard it's not a good idea to go into the mortar.

Do you think I am going overboard here? Is it a dumb idea in the first place to even put a bag like this in hollow block?

I'm not super confident that I understand the forces at play but I think that there are tourque/pulling forces on the top part of the mount while the bottom is more pushing inward toward the wall due to the 45deg brace offsetting the pullout forces and causing the torque to more "press upward" on the block, but the majority of these forces would be transferred to the boards and spread out over a much greater area.

What do my fellow diyers think? I appreciate all responses!

 
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Old 12-08-19, 12:16 AM
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I used to have one in the basement, mounted to the steel I-beam, what is in the garage currently, much easier to hang down than against a wall!
 
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Old 12-08-19, 02:04 PM
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If I had a steel I beam I'd definitely use it. I live in florida so dont have a basement.
 
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Old 12-09-19, 01:21 AM
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Has anyone heard of someone doing this before? Mounting on a garage wall?
 
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Old 12-09-19, 07:12 AM
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The OP did it before, if nothing is available to hang it from then his installing boards across several blocks to distribute the load would seem the best option.
 
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