Moisture Control in Workroom

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-09-20, 08:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Moisture Control in Workroom

Hi,

Before I begin, I'm just an amateur DIYer so please forgive my ignorance.

I'm building a workroom under my backporch. The ceiling is fine but there are no walls.. I'm going to be using plywood to enclose the space. My question is whether or not it's necessary/advisable to use a layer of housewrap and OSB board? The space is unheated and I'm storing my tools in there and I don't want them to rust. Will the exterior paint be a sufficient barrier in keeping the moisture controlled?

Other notes: I'm sealing up the joints with caulking and I have already laid bricks to keep rain water from leaking into the space. I've also accounted for soffits vents.

Thanks for your time,
I really appreciate any help
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-09-20, 09:15 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Canada
Posts: 796
Received 72 Votes on 67 Posts
How did you seal the floor.
That is where most of your moisture will come from.

Not sure why you mention both OSB and plywood?
Yes house wrap is a good idea.

I am assuming that your porch is enclosed so you do not have to worry about moisture entering from above.
 
  #3  
Old 02-09-20, 09:16 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,909
Received 303 Votes on 276 Posts
The purpose of housewrap (a WRB) is to protect the exterior of a building (bare sheathing and framing) from getting wet and rotting. Siding goes on top of the housewrap. You must be thinking of using just plywood as the siding... with no sheathing behind it.

Without knowing what you are envisioning it's hard to say. You say there are no walls. You say you are just using plywood. No studs?

Items in any unheated storage shed are going to rust. The ground and shade keep the shed and tools cool every morning while the outside air warms up during the day and the dewpoint rises. When you open the door to the outside and let that warm air in, all the metal tools will sweat... until they warm up above the dewpoint. If there is no door, ventilation can act in the same way, letting warm moist air into a cooler environment... at least until that ventilation equalizes the temperature.

So the short answer to your question is no... neither paint nor housewrap will have much effect on the humidity in your storage room, since the rust happens mainly because of the temperature of the tools, which makes them susceptible to condensation.
 
  #4  
Old 02-10-20, 12:12 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi, thanks for the quick replies.

Manden,

It's a cement slab, it's been there forever, as far as I know it's never had any kind of sealing treatment. What would you recommend to seal it?

The porch is enclosed. The top part of the porch has a bit of an overhang similar to rafters, I'm going to put soffit vents to keep bugs out.

I'm using plywood as the outer siding [attached to the studs].

Outer Siding: Plywood
Middle: House wrap
Interior Wall: OSB

XSleeper,

Yes, there are studs, I was going to attach the plywood to them.

I see, is there any way that you know of that can I protect my tools?

Thanks again
 
  #5  
Old 02-10-20, 05:35 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,909
Received 303 Votes on 276 Posts
You can apply the housewrap directly to the studs before you put the plywood on. Insulating the walls and heating the room (space heater) then running a fan to move the air around would be the best way to prevent the tools from rusting.
 
  #6  
Old 02-10-20, 07:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Canada
Posts: 796
Received 72 Votes on 67 Posts
First you want to ensure that any water can drain quickly away from the slab.
Without actually being there and see in how high up the slab is above ground level I am just making suggestions.
So for drainage this may involve ditching and a weeping tile.

I am assuming your studs will have a plate attached to the concrete.
I always use pressure treated for this as it is where rot will occur over the long term.
Also use a membrane under the plate to seal/protect it.

Once you get it built put a 2'X2' piece of 6 mill plastic down and hold the edges down.
Leave it for a week, then look under it. You will see if any moisture is wicking up through the concrete.
This is best done during the wettest part of the year.

It would also not be a bad idea to get one of those indoor/outdoor thermometers with a humidity reading and place the outdoor sensor in your workroom. They are available at a reasonable price.
 
  #7  
Old 02-12-20, 02:46 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you Manden and XSleeper.

I'll try the 6mil plastic and see how bad the wicking is.

I think I should be able to insulate/heat the room, it's more work but it's worth it to protect my tools.

Thank you again
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: