which drill bit for wood joist

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Old 04-18-20, 02:04 PM
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which drill bit for wood joist

I am borrowing a Bosch Hammer Drill, it says 1/2". No bits included.
If I want to drill through a few thick wood joists, I want to run a few ether net cables, I need to run a 1/2" copper pipe and a 3/4" copper pipe. In my search what type of bit do I need to create these seperate holes? Wood Paddle/spade bit, normal bit, Cobalt, what is SDS? I don't know jack about this? Why does the drill say 1/2" what is that measurement mean?
 
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Old 04-18-20, 02:54 PM
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Why does the drill say 1/2" what is that measurement mean
That is the largest dia of bit the drill will accept.

You dont need a hammer drill for wood, I dont even know why you are drilling holes through joists for the items mentioned, they can just lay across/above the joists!
 
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Old 04-18-20, 03:08 PM
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But if you must, a spade drill would be preferred.
 
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Old 04-18-20, 03:10 PM
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I would use a 7/8" spade bit but you may have to shorten the shaft. My hammer drill has a regular drill selector. If your borrowed one has that feature use it. The problem with drilling between joists is space for the drill and bit. If you can borrow or even rent an angled drill the job will be much easier.
Running copper pipe perpendicular to, and through joists can also be problematic. Most pipe runs are planned so that they can run mostly parallel to joists. Pipe run perpendicular to the joists will have to be short sections with couplings. I would consider PEX instead of copper.
 
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Old 04-18-20, 03:16 PM
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The OP doesn't say where the joists are located. Unless they are attic floor joists the top may not be available. In any case I would be hesitant to lay copper pipe atop a joist.
 
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Old 04-18-20, 03:35 PM
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I assumed this was underside of joist, Basement?
 
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Old 04-18-20, 03:50 PM
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If you are crossing joists with wiring.... it's best to drill them.
It's not as easy to drill for copper pipe. The biggest problem is that you can only use short pieces which makes running the pipe under the joists a better idea.
 
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Old 04-18-20, 05:55 PM
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Spade bit for wood great. 1/2" max size, got it. Great to know. Thanks so much.
I won't run copper through the joist as you mentioned as that does seem painful. I will hang under the ceiling as suggested. The way the joist in the basement are set up, they are 20' long and there are like two 16''x3' blocks that straddle the joist, connects two joist together as support? So running a pipe East to West will encounter 1-2 dams you have to bore through. I also have to drill through brick that same day, I am mounting a pipe hanger into the brick, any recommendations to drill through brick, small hole for a pipe hanger. Thanks!
 
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Old 04-18-20, 06:52 PM
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The best bit to use is not a spade bit, but an auger bit. It has a thread on the front that pulls the bit through the wood so that you don't have to push so hard. A spade bit would work, and is the least expensive. Just not the right tool for the job. There's a reason electricians use auger bits. You use them in a regular chuck style electric drill. SDS is a special chuck used for rotary hammer drills only.

You would have a hard time finding an SDS bit for wood. They make them, just not usually sold in stores commonly.

if your hammer drill is SDS, you need a different drill. Right angle drills are what's normally used by electricians to drill holes between joists because the length of the drill plus the drill bit plus your hands is usually longer than 14 1/2". (The space available between joists).

If you are running copper through holes in joists I hope you realize that copper doesn't bend and you will need to sweat couplers between joists. The longest pipe you can put in each hole is 14 1/2". Copper generally goes on the surface, and you hold it onto the surface with mounting clips, like these.
 
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Old 04-19-20, 02:54 AM
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If you have to run copper through they have rubber bushings to support pipe. Need a bigger hole but will eliminate noise.Had to use them in sisters house on kitchen remodel where I had to run 30' in wall. Was a 2 x 6 so had room but used auger bit and made hole drilling a snap. Did this 20 years ago and still no noise. I totally forgot I did this as every time I go there kitchen is quite. This is the main feed line to house.
 
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Old 04-19-20, 07:26 AM
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My favorite right angle drill:
Name:  milwaukee-right-angle-drills-3107-6-64_1000.jpg
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Old 04-19-20, 07:33 AM
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An angle drill is one of those tools that you might only need once in while, but well worth having. I think I only used mie maybe once or twice in the pat 20 years.
 
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Old 04-19-20, 10:54 AM
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There's a reason every electician and plumber has that drill.

Also not part of the question, but most guys would probably run pex not copper. Connect the two with Sharkbite unions or Sharkbite shutoffs. Pex is flexible enough to run continuously through holes in joists whereas copper is not.
 
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