How to make an area level with my concrete


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Old 05-01-21, 08:29 AM
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How to make an area level with my concrete

Hi everyone - I have a question for the group. Let me preface this by saying I am not handy AT ALL. As you can see from the picture I have this shed that was there when I moved in. It is about 4 inches or so deep and just lays on plywood which is on top of dirt.

What I want to do is remove the shed and install a larger shed but I need to make the open area which is about 5'x8' level with the existing concrete.

I had 2 estimates to install concrete there of $900 (I'm on long island). In talking with friends (who aren't handy either) the following suggestions came up. Do any of these seem viable?

- Buying a bunch of gravel and 'smoothing' it out and putting the new shed on top of that and the shed will extend over onto the new concrete as well
-Buying about (45) concrete blocks that are 8"x16"x4" and just lining them to about the level of the existing concrete
-Buying 4" thick wood planks and just putting them down level with the concrete

Anyone else have any better ideas? I appreciate the help. I don't think I can pour concrete and level it, I watched some videos online and it seemed hard to me.


 
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Old 05-01-21, 12:30 PM
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No, all your options are prone to failure, do it right put in the slab!
 
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Old 05-01-21, 12:48 PM
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The beautiful thing about your project is that it doesn't matter if it comes out looking bad, your covering it up. Your only using it for support. Just dumping the 1/2 yard of concrete and leveling it isn't that hard. The artistry comes in the finishing.

A couple of 2x4s, some stakes for support. a 2x4 for screeding and a couple of floats. Probably cost you less than $200 for everything including the concrete. That's assuming you can haul a small redimix trailer of concrete. If you have to have it delivered, or are mixing it yourself, then the simple/cheap factor goes away.

If you go the gravel route, get road base and rent a plate compactor. You'll get it pretty solid. Your issue there will be supporting the edge next to the fence. If that gives way, your support will fall away.
 
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Old 05-01-21, 01:17 PM
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The beautiful thing about your project is that it doesn't matter if it comes out looking bad, your covering it up.
BS, it does matter, until the foundation, or lack of, fails and your left with a heaving mess.

Cheap can be expensive and the reply poster will not be living with the mess, you will, just do it right from the beginning!
 
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Old 05-01-21, 02:07 PM
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In some areas putting a shed on poured concrete is a dividing line where you need zoning approval and building codes. So, your simple shed swap could get expensive. It's usually not a problem at first but if any neighbor gets upset and calls it in or if it's seen when an inspection is being done on a neighboring home. Your part of the country is not known for a loose attitude towards code enforcement.
 
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Old 05-01-21, 04:40 PM
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I stand by what I posted. I wouldn't care if I didn't have a perfect broom finish, stamped concrete, salt finish under my shed. If I don't have the funds to pay a pro for that finish, but I'm able to screed and provide a reasonably flat surface for my shed, I've met my goals. This is something most people are able to accomplish. IMO, the artistry/talent in concrete is providing a finish that looks good. Most of the other is easy to learn grunt work. This site is called "Doityourself", not "Hireapro". Not sure where you got a lack of foundation or a heaving mess out of my post but...whateva...
 
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Old 05-02-21, 03:44 AM
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Thanks for responding. Has anyone used these before? Plastic shed base? this seems like something I could do.

https://www.amazon.com/Standartpark-...t-items&sr=1-4


 
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Old 05-02-21, 08:28 AM
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According to their website you would need to add 2-3 inches of fill to bring it up level with your concrete. It shows it only 1 1/8" tall. You still would have the issue of supporting the side next to the fence so that the fill under the matt doesn't fall away and leave the mat unsupported. Otherwise it look like a useful product.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgB9wkMTq8g&t=131s
 
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Old 05-02-21, 05:10 PM
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Thanks tumble. Good point about the fence. Hmmmm any idea what I can use to make sure it doesn't fall out against the fence?
 
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Old 05-03-21, 08:50 AM
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It looks like you might have a fence on two sides? If so, this complicates the issue more. Since you have very little working space, I can't think of anything you could do that would be permanent. Maybe some company makes these things in the 4" height you need? If not your back to a concrete solution.
 
 

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