How to add more overhead storage in the garage?


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Old 03-24-24, 09:05 AM
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How to add more overhead storage in the garage?

Looking for a way to add more overhead storage in the garage. It's a small two-car garage and I'm trying to get everything I can off the floor.

Above the joists, I could fit a 4x8 piece of plywood, but the distance between the joists is only 22.5. I don't think I can angle it into position with that 2x4 going across the top of all the joists. Maybe if I temporarily removed it, but even then I think it'd be difficult to angle in with only that 22-in opening.

Would some thinner sheathing or hardwood have enough flex to get into place?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-5-in-x...1178/203183010

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-8-in-x...3096/100543684




 
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Old 03-24-24, 01:38 PM
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You have engineered trusses so do NOT remove anything, even "temporarily". Do not cut, notch or drill holes in them. It is OK to drive nails and screws into them.

As for getting sheeting up above just cut it into smaller pieces. You've got 24" truss spacing so you need something as stiff as possible. Not something flexible.
 
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Old 03-24-24, 02:02 PM
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We don't have anything drilled into them currently and the electrical is going over the top of them at the moment.

I understand they're engineered but that 2"x4" going across them must be doing exactly nothing without external stress. It's just nailed into the top of the trusses and not very well. If I took it out and put it back in it would probably be more secure than it is now.

As for the flexibility, I was hoping to get a 4x8 ft sheet up in there somehow, but I just don't think there's any way. If I cut them up, they're even less secure and are not as strong as one solid piece.

With the angle of the roof, there's very little chance of anything being heavy enough to cause an issue with something that's flexible. Even at 2 ft. No one can stand on it. Maybe if somebody was inclined to hang from it with their hands they could break it or something.

I found some 5.5 mm 4'tx4' ft boards at home Depot. They have a little bit of a flex and I was able to get one in there to try it out. It seems to work well.
 
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Old 03-24-24, 02:05 PM
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You do not understand engineered trusses.
That 2x4 keeps the walls from blowing open.

Technically.....a truss setup does not allow for any additional suspended load.
Cut the 4x8 sheets into 1x8 strips.
 
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Old 03-24-24, 07:35 PM
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Yes, that is the theory but the wall is not going to go anywhere if I remove the one 2"x4" and then put it back. The one was thinking about removing is not even completely secured as it should be. Actually looking around up there, there's a lot of nails that look like they're working their way out which is concerning or we're not nailed flush.

Yes, don't mess with them, don't cut notches out of them, don't drill big holes into them but temporarily removing that one 2"x4" will, in all likelihood, not cause an instant catastrophic failure or even any movement. If it did, I'd hope they would have nailed it in properly and or used some kind of bracket.

As I stated, I found a 4'x4' piece of wood that meets my needs. I just would have rather have had a 4x8 but there's none locally available and it would have been difficult to get into place if at all without removing that one. 2"x4".. I don't have a table saw to cut them into strips and or a good way to them attach the one at the edge of the roof with no room to nail into place.
 
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Old 03-24-24, 07:41 PM
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Home Depot will cut down sheets of plywood for free.
 
Tanquen voted this post useful.
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Old 03-24-24, 08:23 PM
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I had used their chop saw station but did not know they had a table saw setup and would rip a 4'x'8 for free. My issue then is how to attach the one closest to the edge of the roof and letting go of the idea of a nice contiguous piece. With the 4'x4’ I was able to get 6 nails in and it seems secure but I can't get to the edge closest to the window. Maybe I’ll take another look at what they have as I would like to get something ” thick but for now a few of the 4’x’4 pieces will work.

Thanks for all the info.
 
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Old 03-25-24, 03:17 AM
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You could screw the plywood to the bottom of the truss bottom chord and gain 3-1/2". Because your plywood will be supporting a load, don't use drywall screws, deck screws, or the like; use conventional screws, fairly closely spaced. Also, keep your storage VERY light. Truss bottom chords are only designed to take 10 pounds per square foot ceiling weight and that adds up pretty fast.
 
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Old 03-25-24, 08:06 AM
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I did think about mounting on the bottom and it would add a little height but the bottom of the trusses would be like little walls and I'd rather have one big flat service. Also, I'd need someone to help mount it from the bottom, I don't think it would be as strong and I may, someday, want to sheet rock it all... maybe.
 
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Old 03-25-24, 08:22 AM
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If you just want light storage, 10 lbs per sq ft as mentioned, I would probably rip 4x8 pieces of plywood down to 24" wide (2' x 4' pieces) and then sheet the top of every other bay. That way you could easily poke your head up there and access those 2 ft wide shelves with a ladder every 2 feet. And you'd still have plenty of natural light to see what's up there.
 
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Old 03-25-24, 08:29 AM
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You could look into renting a drywall lift for a day. Around here, they run about $40. I used a drywall lift several years to put 12' sheetrock on a vaulted ceiling by myself.
 
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Old 03-26-24, 05:09 AM
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The two parallel 2x4s that run the depth of the garage are not part of the manufactured trusses.
They are there to prevent bowing of the truss bottoms which would want to move the side walls inwards. The same result could be achieved with 22.5 inch 2x4 braces between the truss bottoms. The trusses don't look that robust so I would place any weight carrying platform towards side walls at the cost of headroom. I see no reason each existing 2x4 can't be temporarily removed to place a row of 4x8 sheets of plywood on top of truss bottoms and then reattach parallel 2x4s in same locations as the existing location splits the truss width into thirds. Attaching row of plywood to trusses will aid in preventing bowing.
 
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Old 04-15-24, 04:32 PM
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Just putting some empty box on them, nothing too heavy.
I just put in a few of these: Underlayment Common: 5.0 mm x 4 ft. x 4 ft.


 
 

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