best new shed floor material


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Old 05-13-24, 09:23 PM
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Question best new shed floor material

I am building a new shed i am not sure what size i am thinking about maybe 10x14. I am building it myself and my old shed had tongue and groove oak floor in it that was reclaimed from another building many years ago. I think it was only about 1/2" thick but it worked.

I see a lot of people using plywood and USB flooring in new sheds. I don't like plywood because it warps when it gets water on it and since i am building this shed myself i don't know how quick i can get a roof on it. So i am thinking about using treated 1x8 pine lumber for a floor. My only issue is if it's still wet and shrinks it will leave gaps. So i would have to make sure the wood was dry when i nail it in so it don't shrink and leave gaps.

I don't think water will be a big problem inside the shed other than if my lawn mower has water on the tires when i park it. Or a snow shovel that has snow on it that melts and leaves a puddle. But do you think that using treated 1x8 pine boards is a good or bad idea?
 
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Old 05-14-24, 03:49 AM
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Advantech OSB is very water resistant. We used it on my son's addition and rain ran off the house roof flooding the subfloor multiple times while we waited on trusses. All it did to the advantech was discolor it.
 
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Old 05-14-24, 03:55 AM
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Plywood with lino over it or composite decking.
 
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Old 05-14-24, 05:20 AM
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How will you prevent underside of floor from absorbing moisture if built on ground?
 
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Old 05-14-24, 05:25 AM
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I second the recommendation for Advantech. It is highly water resistant, stays flat and is very strong. It is not pressure treated so it will need to be protected from the weather but it's a very good material.
 
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Old 05-14-24, 05:36 AM
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It is not pressure treated so it will need to be protected from the weather
True but it's very good at withstanding the elements for a couple of months. I think that is the main reason it's so popular in the house building industry.
 
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Old 05-14-24, 06:20 AM
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I agree that Advantec is the way to go.
 
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Old 05-14-24, 07:33 AM
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How will you prevent underside of floor from absorbing moisture if built on ground?
I can't that's why i thought it should be treated. My plan is to dig out a rectangular hole 8" deep and dump CA6 road pack and level it out. Then put down some concrete blocks to keep the shed skids from being in contact with the ground all of the time. But i am still slightly worried about moisture under the shed causing rot. That's why my plan was to build the deck of treated lumber so it will be somewhat rot proof.

How well will Advantec be at lasting another 40 years? The Oak did extremely well until termites decided to eat it. They mostly went for the pine studs but they did eat some of the oak.
 
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Old 05-14-24, 08:48 AM
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Termites are hard to figure. My wife's sister's house had oak in one bed rm and pine in another - they destroyed the oak floor but never touched the pine.

IMO if the shed can't be raised enough to allow air ventilation under the floor it should have a concrete floor.
 
 

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