Squaring Garage


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Old 07-06-02, 06:04 PM
lori_lucille
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Squaring Garage

My boyfriend and I are building a garage and we need a little help with squaring it up. It's gonna be 32' by 24' and would like to know if anyone knows the dimensions that it will come up to crosswise. Going from one post in front to the opposite side in back.
 
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Old 07-06-02, 06:13 PM
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40.

Simple geometry a squared times b squared equals c squared.

(24x24) + (32x32) = c squared

576 + 1024 = c squared

1600 = c squared

c = square root of 1600 = "40"
 
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Old 07-16-02, 11:29 PM
65goldfish
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Re: Squaring Garage

Originally posted by lori_lucille
My boyfriend and I are building a garage and we need a little help with squaring it up. It's gonna be 32' by 24' and would like to know if anyone knows the dimensions that it will come up to crosswise. Going from one post in front to the opposite side in back.
What Tow guy was giving you was the Pytheorean Theorem. Very useful, What I would sugest instead of measuring diagonals is measuring the corners of the building or better yet the layout lines before digging the footings. The problem w/ measuring diagonals is you can get the same measurements both ways & it be out of square, by becoming a parallegram! However If you measure 3 feet from the corner one way & 4 feet the other way you will get 5 feet across these. Other Pytheorean triples are 6,8,10 ; 5,12,13 ; 8,15,17 or multiples of these. If you need a great source for any construction project look for a text book called Modern Carpentry by Willis Wagner. You can usually find it on e-bay for less than $10. Hope this helps .....larry
 
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Old 07-17-02, 02:39 AM
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Cool

I agree.
The easiest way to square a footing layout is to use the 3-4-5 method on the corners, and then double-check by measuring the diagonals (corner to corner). Diagonals should be exactly the same.
Set up L-shaped string boards outside each corner by driving three pointed 2X4s in an L shape and nailing 1X4 boards horizontally between them.
Attach the strings to the 1X4s from corner to corner on the perimeter, measure the 3' and 4' marks on the strings, and adjust them until there is exactly 5' between those marks. This squares the corners.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 07-17-02, 05:36 AM
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ok, 'fish, you've got me confused. A parallelogram has equal distance diagonals? Better have a diagram on that as I can't visualize it. A parallelogram can have four equal length sides and not be square, but if the diagonals are exactly the same, that would make it a square (or rectangle as the case may be), right?
 
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Old 07-28-02, 04:08 AM
Y
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the_tow_guy
You are absolutely right.
Before checking diagonals, the oppsite sides need to be checked to be equal.
 
 

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