spring fed pond


  #1  
Old 07-27-02, 11:07 PM
rc384
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spring fed pond

Have an old well that was sealed up but a foot or so from it water will just bubble up after heavy rains or in the spring. This has created a small ditch through my lawn. I love the remains of the old well and have started a garden around it. Is it possible to use this bubbling little spring for a spring fed garden pond? If so how do I build it. Electric pump is not an option due to the location. Please help
 
  #2  
Old 07-28-02, 05:56 AM
howiek's Avatar
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Hello rc384

If circulating or recirculating the water is not a constant option, I'm not sure how successful a pond would be - depending on where you are, you might be overwhelmed with mosquitos which would tend to breed in the still waters and not guaranteeing a constant supply of oxgenated water would limit your ability to put fish in to help control them.

You might be able to create a bog type garden which would take advantage of the mostly soggy conditions, but you'd have to augment the water in tiimes of drought. Same thing would apply about mosquitos, though.

How about creating a dry river bed that would direct seasonal flow to areas where they won't be eroding the land away. You could use river rock and beach stone to line your 'watercourse' and landscape along it's banks, possibly putting a bridge over it, etc. and then when the water flows, it would temporarily have the added attraction of the running water. If your property and resources are such that you could create a pond in an area where recirculation with an electric pump and replenishing of water in dry periods is possible, you could direct the 'river' to the pond. You'd still have to deal with the overflow created in heavy rain, but that shouldn't be a major problem. Just be careful not to direct the water toward your house foundations or areas on neighbouring properties that wouldn't ordinarily receive the runoff... More commonly, there were big arguements (and fights and lawsuits) over water rights, but if you erode your neighbours' land with newly directed water, they might not be all that pleased, either...

It'll be interesting to see what others suggestion - that's one of the really neat things about this forum and the design process - with the diversity of people and ideas, you're bound to find something that should work!

Good Luck

Howie
 
  #3  
Old 07-28-02, 07:53 PM
rc384
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Hi Howie

I liked the dry river bed idea. I worked a bit with it this afternoon. I dug a 3 foot wide by 3 foot deep hole at the base of the old well where the bubble appears. Soil was pretty dry for the amount of rain we have had lately. But that area never becomes swampy. When the water bubbles up it just moves in a self made ten inch trench to the edge of the property; at which point I do get the standing water. I picked up some rocks from my property to put in the pond. I live near the Cumberland Mountains and beautiful rocks are abundant. I found some really nice flat ones used to make the old stone fences. I was thinking of widening the hole and placing the stone in like the fences, wells and springs were done in past centuries . I was looking at the trench that is already there and it would not be a problem to reroute slightly and connect with the ditch that runs along side the road.. How would I manage to keep the “river bed “ weed free? Would I need to line everything?
Thanks Again For you suggestion
Charly
 
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Old 07-28-02, 08:43 PM
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Hi again Charly

Glad to be a bit of help

You could put down some black landscape fabric before you put the stone down to help keep weeds from sprouting from what's already there. New vegetation might self seed in time, but with the barrier down, the roots shouldn't penetrate into the soil below so should pull out fairly easily.

You are lucky to have rock readily available that you can use - I had to pay ~$50.00 per ton to have some moved into my area for my pond... Kinda a twist on Murphy's Law - if you need something that is someone else's bain, it usually will not be abundant where you are and you'll end up paying for it...

Good Luck with your project!

Howie
 
 

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