green water pond.......

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  #1  
Old 09-12-02, 05:56 PM
BIG BLUE
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Question green water pond.......

I am having a terible problem with my pond. It is all green with algae and I have treated it with PH lower and crystal pond granules. It gets the full sun all day and my water hyacinth and water lettuce and lillies are dying. My son and I are having a debate over a semi-cover for it. Like possibly a lattice work top to shield it form some of the sun. A friend at work gave me some copper sulphate granules but since I have fish I am afraid to use it. Any suggestions??? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-13-02, 10:13 AM
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Location: Maryland zone 7
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Here's some faqs on green water from Garden Web. Hope this helps.

http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/p...559024333.html

Newt
 
  #3  
Old 09-16-02, 02:43 PM
BIG BLUE
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i went to the website and the search engine to farther the look but i seen no really go solution to the problem. Maybe i over looked it. Our pond is in sunlight 100% of the time from sun up until sun down. Maybe it cannot be controled. I did see something baout have atleast 60% of the water surface covered. We keep the PH level right along with the other levels but we're having problems to get the water hiethiens to grow. Everyone else has a pond full of them and theirs is in alot of sunlight. We fertilize the pond when needed and still no growth......if anything some of them die. I don't know really whats going on. Any idea for some good plants that like 100% sunlight? Sorry to keep botheing yall but i'm lost here.

Thanks alot,
Josh
 
  #4  
Old 09-16-02, 09:11 PM
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Location: Maryland zone 7
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Hi Josh,

You're not bothering me at all. Part of the fun of doing this is being able to help others.

I am wondering what you are fertilizing the pond with. I think you've just revealed the problem! Fertilizing the pond will cause the algae to grow and that is what is turning the pond green. It could also be what is killing your water hyacinths. Also if you have lawn near your pond and fertilize that, the water run off from rain or watering the lawn will cause the fertilizer to get into the water and cause the algae to grow.

To shade 60% the water from full sun, try some water lilies. They're easy to grow, have nice large leaves and should be on sale now in your zone. Don't get the tropical ones, but do get hardy ones. The tropicals won't live over the winter. They're easy to recognize when in bloom as the flower has a longer stem and sits well above the water. The hardy lilies will have the flower sitting ON the water.

I think fertilizing the pond is your problem. Clean out the filter and stop fertilizing and see if that helps.

Here's another site that might be helpful.
http://users.erols.com/kutzlo/tkweb.htm

Here's a site that sells pond straw or barley straw. That might be a natural way to help your algae bloom.

http://www.lilypons.com/cgi-bin/shop...46102169957.4c

Let me know about the fertilizing.
Newt
 
  #5  
Old 09-21-02, 09:19 PM
BIG BLUE
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Thanx for the help again and i hate to break it to ya but i'm thinking the fertilizing probably isn't the problem. I only put fertilizer tablets in the soiled containers themselves when the plant looks like it needs it. Maybe once or twice, sometimes three times a year, not that often. As far as water running off the yard, thats would be pretty much impossible to because i put a drainage system min so the surrounding water run-off would not enter the pond and effect it. I've been told maybe it's the fact that the weather went from a constant warm feeling to a cool in te morning to a fairly warm in the evening. I don't know if this is it though. A guy once told me a pond has to run a life cycle..........you can add as many additives to try to clear it up as you want but until it runs it's cycle, nothings gonna change. When i first put the water garden in, this was so. It took about a week and a half to 2 weeks and then it was as clear as drinking water. for about a month or a month and a half now, the water has been a mucky green and the water hiethens have started to die. All the levels are correct. The cat tail is growing like never before but nothing else is. Thanx for the advice everyone!!

Josh
 
  #6  
Old 09-22-02, 04:24 AM
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Location: Acton, Ontario, Canada - Zone 6b
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Hi Josh & Newt & Everyone else

Sometimes the pond has to find it's own equalibrium like your friend said...

Last year, our water hyacinths didn't spread, turned yellow and generally looked appauling. This year, we have to weed them out every week or so they're so thick... (and they've been blooming for about three weeks now )

Only thing we are doing differently this year is I've added peat moss (stuffed into old socks) to lower the pH to around 7.6 - I might have mentioned this before - you can buy peat pellets for an arm and a leg (same with small bundles of barley straw, which basically does the same thing), but you can get a 6 cu ft bale of peatmoss for under $10.00CDN - 2 or 3 Size 7 sockfulls refreshed every 6 weeks or so will treat a 700 gallon pond! (Or maybe we just had a bad 'batch' of hyacinths last year... )

We also had a huge bloom of string algae in the spring, but it miraculously cleared up on it's own when the water temps began maintaining above 65F, the pH stayed around 7.6 and the hyacinths and lettuce started spreading. (We do use a bacteria regularly)

Kinda a vicious circle - the water is staying clear now that the hyacinths and water lettuce are flourishing and filtering the water, but to establish the water hyacinths and lettuce, we had to have conditions right for them to grow in - temp, pH and nutrients all have to be balanced...

Are you using bacteria to try to control the algae or the chemical products? I'm not sure you can use both at the same time - the chemicals might overpower the bacteria... but if you can maintain a more 'natural' ecosystem, it should be easier to care for in the long run...

If your cattails are flourishing your pH is probably okay, but just out of curiosity, what is the average reading you're getting?

I'm inclined to agree with Newt on the fertilizing - I'd try to hold off of them - if you have healthy fish and snails in the pond, their eliminations should be more than enough to provide nutrients for the plants.

Two other things that come to mind immediately:
- what size of pump do you have and what's the total gallonage of your pond? (you may have told us in previous posts - if so, sorry...) - if you can maintain a turnover of about 3 times an hour or more and you have the water cascading down a stream or waterfall, you should be getting good flow and oxygenation of the water, but if the rate of flow is less than that or you have areas in the pond where there is little or no water movement, it might be affecting the overall system...
- are you feeding your fish? - the added nutrients to the ecosystem could be tipping the balance to favour algae growth. Fish should be able to survive on the roots of water plants, algae and insects that happen into the pond.

More questions than answers, I'm afraid...

Sorry 'bout that...

Howie
 

Last edited by howiek; 09-22-02 at 04:41 AM.
  #7  
Old 09-22-02, 11:53 AM
BIG BLUE
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Hello Howiek,

Let me start off by thanking you along with everyone else who has stuck this one through with me as long as they have. We're gonna figur eit out sooner or later. The water garden i have is around 550 to 625 gallons, no more, no less. I had it down to a tee about a year ago and lost the sheets i had on it. The pump we have is a 350 GPH pump. I had a smaller one than that and ungraded. The guy at the local pet shop said this one i have now would work alot better. He said to much water turn-over could hurt more than help. AS far as using "bacteria" to control the level, i have nor had any idea to use it. I new for sure the chlorine and PH level but thats it. I am gonna try to use some of the peat moss though since you say it helps you out alot. I don't know if this would have alot to do with it but our pump system has a hook up for a water fall(which takes a 3/4 inch hose which means it flows fairly decent) and it also has a 1/2 tube you can screw on top of the pump itself and put 1 of 2 attachments that come with it. We've got the fountian attachment on it right now which allows that water to splurge up about 5 or 6 foot maybe. MAybe that has nothing to do with anything, i'm just trying to lay it all out on the table. I haven't been feeding the fish alot up until the past week or so and i only feed them once daily and thats in the afternoon and i put food into the water unti lthey stop eating and thats all they get. I alsways thought they would make it off the root system of the plants but didn't know for sure. Maybe we can elimanate some more possibilities with all this said. Thancks again....

Josh
 
  #8  
Old 09-24-02, 03:04 PM
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Hi again Josh

For some reason, I thought you were using bacteria....

Here's a link (sorry, it's a commercial site) that will give you some of the basics for a balanced ecosystem :http://www.thepondbroker.com/water101.shtml

This is the system that I am using (Parent company is Aquascape out of Chicago), and so far am gatting much more enjoyment out of it than headaches!

Don't want to contradict your Pond person, but I think your flow rate and water turnover is a bit low - also would depend on how the water is getting 'filtered'...

Like I have said before, the system I'm using now pretty much takes care of itself - just have to add bacteria at the beginning of the season and every now and then to recharge it. Problem with using chemicals is that they often will throw the balance off so youhave to use another or more chemicals to correct, etc, etc, etc...

There are a lot of sources for the bacteria and closed eco-system type ponds around - I hope others here will share their sources and experiences also.

Howie
 
  #9  
Old 10-04-02, 04:29 PM
Gman17
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green water problem

Hey Big Blue,
I also had this problem with my pond, I tried the chemicals, the water test kits for ph levels, and the barley bales ( which were supposed to gather the algae ). None of which worked. I bought a UV filter. The UV light kills the green water causing algae. The filter has an ultraviolet light inside that the water circulates around. It also has an assortment of foam filters inside it to trap all the sludge of fish waste, decomposing leaves or grass , and also clumps of algae. I also installed a pump that could handle all the sludge. You also need to circulate the water in your pond twice an hour. In other words, your pumps should pump twice the amount of water in your pond through a filtering device every hour. It took about seven to ten days for the UV light to clear my water. It has kept it clear for six months now. Oh, by the way, my pond only gets about twoo to four hours of sunlight a day. I haven't had a problem with too much or not enough sunlight. I hope this will help with your green water problem as good as it did with mine.
Good Luck Gman17
 
  #10  
Old 10-06-02, 02:38 AM
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Gman17,

I had to jump in here and ask about plants, since the pond I'm thinking about(planing stage) will only get about your amount of sun exposure.
Have you had any problems maintaining the sun loving plants, which ones can you suggest.
The UV light is a good suggestion - I used one years ago during my 'aquarium" days.

Thanks,
fred
 
  #11  
Old 10-06-02, 02:09 PM
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Hi Fred,

Here's a site that lists some shade plants for ponds.

Hope this helps,
Newt
 
  #12  
Old 10-06-02, 02:10 PM
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Talking Oops! Here's that link!

Oops! Shade plants for ponds.

http://www.koivet.com/plants/shadelovers.html

Newt
 
  #13  
Old 10-06-02, 04:59 PM
Gman17
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Hey Fred,
The only plants I have used are water lettuce and water hyacinth, both of which did very well. I haven't tried any other sun-loving plants as of yet, but when I do I will post back with my results.
Gman17
 
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