new garden spot

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  #1  
Old 02-23-03, 11:14 AM
hvac4u's Avatar
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new garden spot

at other homes, i have had some very nice vegetable gardens, potatoes and brussel sprouts are my favorites to grow. i am in a new home, will be here many years, and i want to prepare a spot for the new garden. best spot is bordered heavily by pine, and am actually removing many small (2 ft) pines to make this space. it was cleared 3 yrs ago for construction, but has sprouted these "volunteers" since then. good sun, easy access to water, etc. what should i put in the soil when i begin to till? i am sure the pines affect it's acidity, just don't know how. thanks for the help
 
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Old 02-23-03, 06:46 PM
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Run a soil sample by your county extension service to learn about acidity and how much correction may be needed. Rotted compost is good for any soil.
 
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Old 02-23-03, 07:58 PM
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Smile Blend & test then ammend the soil.

Seems like all I have been doing with my life for many years now. I have been tilling & pulling rocks & roots, as I till the hard packed dirt to build yet another Garden.

After I get the soil tilled & free of as much junk as possable, I take two inexpensieve tests, a PH test, & an N,P,K test. You can find both kits for under 20 dollars & use then more than once.

You may find you need to bring the PH up or down depending on what you find. If you need to Sweeten, less acid, nurtilize the acid etc. I would reccomend a product like Franklins, Hi-Cal Limestone brand choice is ok, but it must be Hi-Cal Limestone this is a must.

The cheap grey Dolomitic Limestone is very low in Calicum, & high in Magnesium, don't use this it will do you very little good. Calicium has just been found by the, we well get there soon FDA, to have an extra positive effect, on every part of the plants & our own bodies. Plant's are our best source of calcium, but only if the plant has enough to begin with.

Of course every primitave agrarian culture, used sea shells or some natural sourse of Hi-Calcium, to help release the Nitrogen, Phosforus, Potash, locked in to an acid soil.

Granulated Kelp meal about 40 lbs per year will cover you on every Micronutriant our bodies will ever use due to the fact that Kelp is rich in Ocean minerals. Many gardeners do not have access to the test equipment, needed to determine if a plant is suffering from a Micronutrient deficiency. Kelp Meal prevents this, so you can rule this whole MN defeciency out from the begining.

Marturo
 
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