Garden Border

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-23-03, 10:19 PM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Garden Border

I want to put a border around my vegetable garden (25'x15'). It used tobe borded by down tree logs but are almost completely rotten out now.
Been thinking about rail road tiles, but they are too heavy and probably overkill for me, although I like it will last almost forever.
What are other cheaper options anyone can suggest?
Thanks,
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-24-03, 05:56 AM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Question Border

Hi GADGET K

Welcome to the DIY Garden Forum! For a long time, I used reinforced chicken wire around my garden and did an adequate job of keeping the rabbits out. My grandfather has had the same fence up for over 30 years. I'm not sure what material it is, but appears to be some iron fencing material held up by galvanized steel rods and pipes.

What, if any, animal pests do you have in your area?
 
  #3  
Old 02-24-03, 07:00 AM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for reply. The border I have in mind is mostly for cosmetics purpose and may be for slight raised bed. No animal to speak of. Sorry not been specific.
I've been wondering what do they do with the replaced rail tiles?
Do rail companies sell them or give away?
How about concrete blocks..no, they don't like natural.
The 4x4 treated lumber probably is best, but that is after I exhausted other options.
 
  #4  
Old 02-24-03, 07:10 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 9,483
There are some environmental concerns about using pressure treated wood products around food grown for human consumption.
 
  #5  
Old 02-24-03, 07:31 AM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Thumbs up Gotcha

Hi again.

OK, now that I've got a picture of what you have....... My in-laws next door neighbor has a raised bed vegetable garden with a fence around it. I'm not sure of the material, but I believe it is something along the lines of welded wire. It's about 6' high and makes a nice deterrent as well as being aesthetically pleasing.

Since we are talking veggie gardening here, what do you have planned?

Eric
 
  #6  
Old 02-24-03, 07:42 AM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Usually this time of the year I would saw seeds of snowpeas, chinese cabbages outdoors and germinate lufa and cucumber indoors.
Quick question on snowpea. It seems to me the yield is getting worse every year. I guess it is because I planted on the same sopt every year and depleted the nutrients. But my lot is too small to plant at different spot, so what do I do?
I am in cental NC.
 
  #7  
Old 02-24-03, 08:21 AM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Snow Pea Issues

Low yield can be sometimes attributed to too much nitrogen. If you examine the plants at the end of the season, do they appear to be all leaf and no flower? If so, you are dealing with a nitrogen excess. Since all legumes are high in nitrogen, choose a fertilizer low in N, such as a 0-10-10 or a 5-15-15. My peas get sidedressed with a 0-10-10 twice during the season, and the yield is always spectacular. Keep in mind as well that peas are an early season crop. Hot (which I define here as soil temperatures above 70 degrees) will cause peas to bolt (go quickly to seed without producing)

Perhaps Marturo can offer you some more info in addition to what I have said

Eric
 
  #8  
Old 02-24-03, 07:05 PM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Eric:
That makes a lot of sense. I did use 10-10-10 on snowpea. I'll try your suggestion this year.
Thanks,
 
  #9  
Old 02-25-03, 09:12 PM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Wink

Hi, Eric, This is Gadget K again. Talked about snow pea being too leafy, it struck me that several years ago someone shared an interesting way of enjoying snow pea with me. In addition to the delicious pea pod, the tender shoots or the young stems (I don't know how to call them). Anyway, the top section of the plant, I'll say about 10", you can cut them and cook(stir fry,to be exact and never overcook just a quick hot stir fry ..15 seconds maybe) and it is no less delicious than the pod itself.
Try it if yours gets too leafy.
 
  #10  
Old 02-26-03, 05:51 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
GADGET K,

You don't want pressure treated lumber or creosoted rr ties for you border. Cedar is an alternative, along with stone, bricks, etc.

All,
Actually don't need to fert peas, they take in all the nitrogen they need from the air.

fred
 
  #11  
Old 02-26-03, 06:20 AM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Peas and such

GADGET K,
That actually sounds pretty interesting. I never heard of anyone actually cooking the plants, but maybe I will give it a shot this year.

Fred,
I know they dont need any nitrogen, but for some reason, my peas always seem to do better with an extra shot of phosphorous and potassium. Hey, maybe they are as weird as their nurturer Glad to have you back Fred. Welcome to 2003!

Eric
 
  #12  
Old 02-26-03, 07:23 AM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks, Fred
I knew cedar is rot-resistant, but never thought of using in the ground. Where can I get them? What size do you recommend? (Can not hual too heavy with my small suv). My lot is about 25'x15'. And how long do you think they will last?
 
  #13  
Old 02-26-03, 08:08 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Hi Eric,

Well, I'm always here, maybe just not gardening - been hiding in other forum areas.
It's a bit tough to garden in the snow and ice.!!

(although I do have a few plants and seeds started)

soon?
fred

GADGET K,
Cedar boards may be all you can find - will last a few yrs.
OR, IF you can find newer AC2 landscape timbers. The older and still available CCA timbers are the ones you want to avoid - contain arsenic. CCA's can be used, but you don't want your veggies too close.
fred
 
  #14  
Old 02-26-03, 08:34 AM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Smile Gardening - An Activity For All Seasons

It certainly is, but its always fun to talk about the upcoming season and get excited. Hopefully it is soon that the ground can be worked. Unfortunately, Mother Nature teased us here in New England last week with a couple of 50+ degree days. It's now 13 outside It will, however, be time to build the second greenhouse in about two weeks
 
  #15  
Old 02-26-03, 07:54 PM
howiek's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Acton, Ontario, Canada - Zone 6b
Posts: 413
Hi All

Gadget K - hope you didn't take my bouncing you around from Lawns too seriously or personally... (the A/C thread) - pushed the 'move' button before I realized that Eric had copied to Lawns... *oops again*

My neighbours introduced us to Snow Pea greens a few years back - they just stir fried them and they are GOOD!

Just thinking about the wall materials - what about the new plastic woods (the recycled plastic product that looks like wood and can be worked like timber).... comes in dimensional sizes and although about double (or more) the initial cost, will last virtually forever, shouldn't be an environmental concern (leaching) and doesn't need maintenance.

Just my 2 cents worth...

Howie

btw, it's been -20C/-4F at night on a regular basis for the last few weeks up here in the frozen north... hoping that you'll send some of your warmth from below the 49th up here soon!

H
 
  #16  
Old 02-26-03, 08:41 PM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi all, no harm done! I do need more exposure anyway.
Back to my favorite...snowpea, I planted another row (15') today to ensure a bumper crop. But one critical question I never ask: How dense should I plant the seeds? I know I over did it...I sowed 2 packs of seeds on this 15'x2' strip. One pack regular (flat type),one sugar snap. What do you guys recommend the right density? If I can do it again, I 'll sow one pack and resow the other in 2 weeks. I was plain lazy.
Howie: I'll look into plastics railing material. It sounds like a good option. Thanks,
 
  #17  
Old 02-26-03, 08:57 PM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
GADGET K,

Sugar snaps are the first(maybe 2nd-onions) thing I plant and the ground is usually still cool. I plant one row, one how wide, about 30 feet long and put in about 1 1/2 lbs of seed. That's pretty dense, but I want to insure good germination since the ground is cool and damp. Some seeds will just rot.
Dense is okay since they don't compete for nitrogen.

where are you located - planting peas already?? just envious!!

fred

3 inches of new white fluff tonight so far.
 
  #18  
Old 02-26-03, 09:29 PM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Fewalt:
I am in Greensboro NC. Did I jumped the gun again?
I hope I did not.
 
  #19  
Old 02-27-03, 04:51 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Gadget K,

Well, you're about 80 miles south of me. My garden is wet and covered with fresh snow. Howecver, last year at this time I was tilling with my TB Horse.
If your seeds germinate fine you're in good shape. I've had peas come up through the snow in the past
If you have poor germination due to rotting(soil too wet), it's plenty early to replant if you have to. It's all part of gardening -- experimentation.
good lock,
fred

( HOE - I know Hoe is not spelled how, it was late!!)
 
  #20  
Old 02-27-03, 05:38 AM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Hey all,
Good planting space for peas is about 1" Sure, they dont need to compete for nitrogen, but IMHO, planting peas too close together causes the tendrils to find other plants instead of the climbing apparatus (be it a trellis, fence, or the line) and then you just end up with a tangled mess instead of something that looks almost as good as it tastes "Food for thought"

Eric
 
  #21  
Old 02-27-03, 07:46 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Hi Eric,

Well, on the other hand, in my 6 inch wide row that is densely seeded, if one or two tendrils across the row find my supporting lines, the other tendrils can go along for the ride and also be supported. And I get alot more pea pods, that is, if we can keep g'daughter from eating the pods like candy right off the vine.
(Papa's also guilty!!!)

fred
 
  #22  
Old 02-27-03, 08:02 AM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Eric & Fred:
Any preference interms of planting rows in North-South or East-West direction? Just wondering..
 
  #23  
Old 02-27-03, 08:24 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
No preference for me. I've done it both ways.
I just arrange my plantings so tall plants don't shade the smaller ones. And I like the early morning sun to hit all plants to evaporate dew to avoid any dampness (fungus) type problems.

fred
 
  #24  
Old 02-28-03, 07:53 PM
Bomber's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 273
Exclamation And Another Thing

Hey GADGET K,
Another important thing that no one has hit one yet........

It is important to put down pea & bean inoculate each season. If this isnt done, then the peas will not create the nitrogren needed for the following season. Even after the peas have been planted, you can put this on the soil, and rake it in to the top inch or so.

Eric
 
  #25  
Old 03-01-03, 06:58 AM
GADGET K
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Eric:
Please refresh my memory about this material..vaguely have some idea...have not seriously gardened for a while ( but definetely picking up this year)...you can tell.
Regards,
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'