Good time to trim branches?

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-06-03, 08:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 653
Good time to trim branches?

I have some trees on the border of my yard and the neighbor's, and the trees are overhanging onto his side of the line. Wouldn't be too big a deal, except that the shade created won't allow grass to grow. The neighbor has asked me to cut the branches off.

In order to maintain the best possible health of the tree, is there a particular time of year when it's best to trim branches?

Thanks!
Dave
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-06-03, 04:30 PM
marturo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,448
Smile No time like the present.

Hi CycleZen,

The time is right now. A sharp bow saw, long handle pruners & hand prunners. Clean the sharpened tools with papper towels and Alcahol. Like a surgeon you are cutting open flesh that can be infected.

Don't forget to get some (TreeKote Wound dressing Pruning & grafting Compound) to apply to cover the cut areas of the tree. The bottle with the brush is less expensieve, & covers better than sprays.

There are some good links in the helpful Garden Links on pruning also.

Good luck with your task.
 
  #3  
Old 03-07-03, 10:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 653
This weekend, I promise!

Thanks, Marturo, I'll get the TreeKote. Good to run into you here, too: seems like we're bumping into each other a lot!
 
  #4  
Old 03-07-03, 12:54 PM
marturo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,448
Smile Small World when you look at it

CycleZen, It does seem to be a small forums, or we have some similar interest

I worked as a Motorcycle wrench fo a little over 2 decades.

Of course you may be implying Bicycle & those, I had to build or trade for a bike, as an ARMY Brat for 17 years, I never really owned one. I lived in so many different countries I used the lend lease plan, LOL.

Having 1 footlocker, I could take to the next Country made me a DIYer. The Old Mans rules were so strict, we had to scroung for toys untill we learned the barter method.


Anything bigger than that #$&* Foot locker had to stay, so I traded for small items of value (To Brats). I then got in Country, & found another Brat leaving & about to lose his/her bike & traded for it, with my small things.

Now that Brat could carry, what they needed to trade, for a Bike when they landed somewhere. What a life, a new bike in every new Country, scanning the markets for small things to trade for my next bike. Oh yea seeing all the cultures, & learning the ways of the World. Also never having to go through Customs, thank God.

I guess every DIYer has a story of why they took their destiny in their own hands, & started trusting themselves. I could not use a PC I did not build, I wouldn't trust it. Even Girl ARMY Brats took good care of the bikes, so the bike would be worth more. I wonder, If they work on their own cars today?

My last new Truck, my 1969 totaly restored by me. I find it hard after I learn, that this or that job was done by a Human. I find it hard, to believe with proper training, that I can't do that job & do it better in some cases than another Human.

That must be what is called, a Die Hard DIYer

PS: Turpintine does a great job of getting that black tarry pruning sealer, off your hands
 
  #5  
Old 04-05-03, 06:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 653
First, an apology

Marturo, I have to apologize for not getting back to you: hard to believe it's been almost a month since I've been on DIY! We had a death in the family and a number of situations that I had to deal with, not to mention suddenly getting very busy at work. Imagine the nerve of these people, expecting me to actually work and not cruise the internet.

That's a great story! A new bike at every duty station, a bike that would be as good as your own resourcefulness and skill. I bet a lot of kids are more self-reliant, independent, and self-sufficient as a result of that kind of situation.

As for me, I'm *trying* to be the diehard DIYer you talk about. If I could be half as skilled as my Dad was, I'd be content: he was a welder, carpenter, electrician, and mason. I like to think I soaked up a lot of knowledge just by being around him and helping him on all those home projects. My next big project is a replica of the all-steel swingset / tree fort / jungle gym Dad built for us as kids, so I'm likely to be hanging out at the Welding forum for a while!
 
  #6  
Old 04-05-03, 10:03 AM
marturo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,448
Family comes first.

Hello CycleZen,

No need to apologize, for doing what must come first in life. I am truly sorry to hear of your loss.

Oh I know how it feels to be unable to crusie the Wil Wil West you feel soo disconnected.

I think you will be surprised how much of this DIY & some folks need to be self suficient, comes from our childhood experiences. Our parents may have passed in down our DNA that sounds better than jeans LOL.

Your Dad & mine were more self suficient due to what my Dad taught me about living lean in the good old days. Necessity is the Mother of invention. In their younger days even if you had the money you still had to make much of what you needed because you could not find a Wal-Mart .

A DIYer today I believe is choosing this way, because of another saying our Dads handed down to us. If you want something done right, do it Yourself. A revieling look at the good old days of master craftmenship, well maybe not after all .

I did miss so much by not being in the 3 schools in one town growing up of many of my peers. However it is the fact that I did see people in many countries living with different customs & laws.

How could I ever believe, that there was only one way to do something ever again?

I have a small MIG & a medium sized ARC welder. It took some practice but welding is fun so it was no chore to practice. I just discovered not to long ago, that there are rods now that will weld Cast Iron with the ARC.

Do drop in & see us from time to time, BTW Haynes has some good work shop manuals on the many kinds of welding. I got the Mig book & learned all the basics toot sweet.

Take care CycleZen See you on the boards.

Marturo
 
  #7  
Old 04-06-03, 08:09 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 653
Independence

The ties that bind, man, I'm just starting to realize how much I am my father's son. I catch myself talking and even sometimes standing like him, and even see his handwriting in mine.

Sounds like your parents were children of the Depression, too, followed up by wartime rationing etc. So a lot of that self-suffiency was driven by economic need, pure and simple, or in WWII, just by the absence of materials.

Our family moved a lot to follow my Dad's work, so I'm with ya when you talk about the kids that went to school in the same town. The first time I heard somebody say 'I've been going to school with him since kindergarten' I couldn't believe it. But we saw a couple different places and cultures, and it made me thankful to be an American.

Alright, I'm rambling, now, gotta go get some chores done! Thanks for the tip about the Haynes manuals, I'll check em out.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'