remvoing IVY

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  #1  
Old 07-24-03, 11:18 AM
Barbara_Bench
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remvoing IVY

I just bought a new home that is 40 years old. It has lots of IVY around the house that I want to remove. I put round up on the IVY after the green leaves were removed. A friend said that possibly the green leaves are necessary for th eproduct to work.

My question is...what is the best way to remove IVY that is 40 years old and very mature and very thck?
Thank you!
 
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  #2  
Old 07-24-03, 12:11 PM
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The chemicals in Round Up are taken in through the leaves for the most part. Round Up works best when there is new growth on the plant. It takes up the chemicals more readily. Check the label to be sure that Round Up will kill ivy.

If you have just removed all the leaves, there will soon be new leaves.

It might be faster and more certain to dig it up. Then spray herbicide on whatever comes back. The live plants might be easier to work with than the still dead one. Watch out for critters that may have set up housekeeping in the thick beds.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 07-30-03, 05:22 PM
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Herbicide

Because ivy is evergreen, herbicide applications can be made any time of year as long as the temperature is above freezing (or above 40-50 degrees F.). Applications during fall and winter will tend to avoid damage to nearby plants. Avoid getting herbicide on desirable plants. If spraying where there are wildflowers or native plants, spray before they emerge or wait until they die back. Repeat herbicidal treatments are likely to be needed.

Not all chemicals are available in every area. Contact your local Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent for a recommended herbicide for ivy in your area. The herbicide is absorbed through leaves and stems.

Cutting and pulling of ivy may stimulate root growth and additional spread of ivy. Repeat applications of herbicide tend to be required to assure it is transported to the root system to guarantee eradication of ivy.
 
  #4  
Old 08-04-03, 08:17 PM
catsbytwo
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We have a half acre & the back 1/3 was covered with ivy & grape vine. It was a lot of work but between pulling & digging, I got it all out. The following summer I had to do spot checks to see if any was growing back. I would just dig up the new growth. I've not had any come back this summer.

I think this is the best approach for immediate results. You could always spray if any grows back.
 
  #5  
Old 08-09-03, 06:56 AM
TMPaterek
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Hope you don't mind me piggy-backing a question to this thread... I have a partial brick front to my home. I have a vision of a vine growing up it but very specifically. It's about 20' across and goes to a peek with a window on both levels. I want a vine that I can train to be a rather large main stalk with several yet sporadic shoots randomly off the main. I want the main to wander around each window. I have heard that most vines that climb brick will actually set foot into the mortar and eventually destroy the mortar. Does anyone have any recommendations on a specific vine that will have a heavy main stalk and be able to climb the brick without destroying it? I live in Western NY (Zone 5) and get heavy sun from noon till sunset. I also want to avoid any structure to have this vine grow on if possible or maybe something that can not be seen.

Thanks for any help!
TMP
 
  #6  
Old 08-09-03, 06:43 PM
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Vines that grow on houses normally cause damage with the feet that bond to the house. Plants that are in constant contact with the house create a moist environment and can transpire moisture to the surface of the house creating problems related to the moisture: mildew, peeling paint, path for temites. Plants that don't grow on the house can be trained to climb a trellis or to be held by the anchors that glue to the house with an attached wire to hold the plant.

Here is a link to some climbers:

http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Cabin/7334/vines.html

Hope this helps.
 
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